Lays of Ancient Rome: With Ivry, and the Armada

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Page 170 - Then bugle's note and cannon's roar The death-like silence broke, And with one start, and with one cry, The royal city woke. At once on all her stately gates Arose the answering fires ; At once the wild alarum clashed From all her reeling spires ; From all the batteries of the Tower Pealed loud the voice of fear ; And all the thousand masts of Thames Sent back a louder cheer...
Page 159 - Now let there be the merry sound of music and of dance, Through thy corn-fields green, and sunny vines, oh pleasant land of France! And thou, Rochelle, our own Rochelle, proud city of the waters, Again let rapture light the eyes of all thy mourning daughters. As thou wert constant in our ills, be joyous in our joy, For cold, and stiff, and still are they who wrought thy walls annoy.
Page 161 - Now by the lips of those ye love, fair gentlemen of France, Charge for the golden lilies, — upon them with the lance. A thousand spurs are striking deep, a thousand spears in rest, A thousand knights are pressing close behind the snow-white crest ; And in they burst, and on they rush'd, while, like a guiding star, Amidst the thickest carnage blazed the helmet of Navarre.
Page 170 - Rushed down each roaring street; And broader still became the blaze, And louder still the din, As fast from every village round The horse came spurring in: And eastward straight from wild Blackheath The warlike errand went, And roused in many an ancient hall The gallant squires of Kent.
Page 168 - Forthwith a guard at every gun was placed along the wall ; The beacon blazed upon the roof of Edgecumbe's lofty hall ; Many a light fishing-bark put out to pry along the coast, And with loose rein and bloody spur rode inland many a post.
Page 56 - And now he feels the bottom ; Now on dry earth he stands; Now round him throng the Fathers To press his gory hands; And now with shouts and clapping, And noise of weeping loud, He enters through the River-Gate, Borne by the joyous crowd.
Page 171 - Hampstead's swarthy moor they started for the north; And on, and on, without a pause untired they bounded still: All night from tower to tower they sprang; they sprang from, hill to hill...
Page 54 - Was heard from either bank, But friends and foes in dumb surprise, With parted lips and straining eyes, Stood gazing where he sank; And when above the surges They saw his crest appear, All Rome sent forth a rapturous cry, And even the ranks of Tuscany Could scarce forbear to cheer.
Page 33 - LARS PORSENA of Clusium By the Nine Gods he swore That the great house of Tarquin Should suffer wrong no more. By the Nine Gods he swore it, And named a trysting day, And bade his messengers ride forth, East and west and south and north, To summon his array.
Page 52 - Back darted Spurius Lartius; Herminius darted back: And, as they passed, beneath their feet They felt the timbers crack. But when they turned their faces, And on the farther shore Saw brave Horatius stand alone, They would have crossed once more.

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