The Governments of Europe

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Macmillan, 1920 - Europe - 775 pages

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Page 34 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 22 - That as to dispute what God may do is blasphemy, ... so is it sedition in subjects to dispute what a king may do in the height of his power.
Page 354 - They deem it their duty, however, to place on record their view that any such readjustment, while thoroughly preserving all existing powers of self-government and complete control of domestic affairs, should be based upon a full recognition of the Dominions as autonomous nations of an Imperial Commonwealth...
Page 147 - Resolved, &c., iiemine contradicente, that in all aids given to the king by the Commons the rate or tax ought not to be altered by the Lords. (ii) 3 July 1678 Resolved, &c., that all aids and supplies, and aids to his Majesty in Parliament, are the sole gift of the Commons ; and all bills for the granting of any such aids...
Page 152 - ... debt or other financial purposes of charges on the Consolidated Fund, or on money provided by Parliament, or the variation or repeal of any such charges; supply; the appropriation, receipt, custody, issue or audit of accounts of public money; the raising or guarantee of any loan or the repayment thereof; or subordinate matters incidental to those subjects or any of them. In this subsection the expressions "taxation," "public money," and "loan" respectively do not include any taxation, money,...
Page 349 - The policy of His Majesty's Government, with which the Government of India are in complete accord, is that of the increasing association of Indians in every branch of the administration and the gradual development of self-governing institutions with a view to the progressive realisation of responsible government in India as an integral part of the British Empire.
Page 148 - December 2 he proposed a resolution that ' the action of the House of Lords in refusing to pass into law the financial provision made by this House for the service of the year is a breach of the Constitution, and a usurpation of the rights of the Commons '. It was carried by 849 votes to 184.
Page 23 - What cause we your poor Commons have to watch over our privileges, is manifest in itself to all men. The prerogatives of princes may easily, and do daily grow : the privileges of the subject are for the most part at an everlasting stand.
Page 146 - That, in order to give effect to the will of the people as expressed by their elected representatives, it is necessary that the power of the other House to alter or reject bills passed by this House should be so restricted by Law as to secure that within the limits of a single Parliament the final decision of the Commons shall prevail.
Page 62 - Bagehot, the sovereign has three rights — the right to be consulted, the right to encourage, and the right to warn.

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