The Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, Volume 52

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M. Salmon, 1850 - Industrial arts
 

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Page 310 - Nicole, do hereby declare that the nature of my said Invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed, are...
Page 30 - Presents will and ordain that this Our Commission shall continue in full force and virtue, and that you, Our said Commissioners, or any three or more of you, may from time to time proceed in the execution thereof, and of every matter and thing therein contained, although the same be not continued from time to time by adjournment: And...
Page 106 - ... at pleasure either by varying the size of the ball or the distance from which it was released. Various bars (some of smaller size than the above) were subjected by means of this apparatus to successions of blows, numbering in most cases as many as 4,000; the magnitude of the blow in each set of experiments being made greater, or smaller, as occasion required. The general result obtained was, that when the blow was powerful enough to bend the bars through one-half of their ultimate deflection...
Page 189 - During the passageof this experimental train through the tube, a breathless silence prevailed, until the train rushed out exultingly, and with colours flying, on the other side of the tube, when loud acclamations arose, followed at intervals by the rattle of artillery down the straits.
Page 107 - By other machinery a weight equal to half of the breaking weight was slowly and continually dragged backwards and forwards from one end to the other of a bar of similar dimensions to the above. A sound bar was not apparently weakened by ninety-six thousand transits of the weight.
Page 106 - The questions to be examined may he arranged under two heads, namely — 1. Whether the substance of metal which has been exposed for a long period to percussions and vibrations, undergoes any change in the arrangement of its particles, by which it becomes weakened ? 2. What are the mechanical effects of percussions, and of the passage of heavy bodies in deflecting and fracturing the bars and beams upon which they are made to act ? A great difference of opinion exists among practical men with respect...
Page 452 - Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of my said invention and in what manner the same is to be performed, I declare that what I claim is (d).
Page 115 - ... the bottom is made corrugated, to form continuous zig-zag channels, through which the steam circulates, for the purpose of increasing the heating surface. Claims. — 1. The employment ot a current of air, produced by an exhausting fan, for accelerating the evaporation of salt water.
Page 107 - ... thousand successive periodic depressions for each bar, and at a rate of about four per minute. Another contrivance was tried by which the whole bar was also, during the depression, thrown into a violent tremor. The results of these experiments were, that when the depression was equal to one-third of the ultimate deflection, the bars were not weakened. This was ascertained by breaking them in the usual manner with stationary loads in the centre. When, however, the depressions produced by the machine...
Page 30 - We do, by these presents, give and grant to you, or any three or more of you, full power and authority to call before you, or any three or more of you, such persons as you shall judge necessary, by whom you may be the better informed of the truth in the premises...

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