The elements of Latin grammar

Front Cover
Simpkin, Marshall, & Company, 1836 - Latin language - 160 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - PRONOUNS. A Pronoun is a word used instead of a noun, to avoid the too frequent repetition of the same word ; as, " The man is happy," " he is benevolent, "
Page 2 - A word of one syllable, is termed a Monosyllable ; a word of two syllables, a Dissyllable ; a word of three syllables, a Trisyllable ; a word of four or more syllables, a Polysyllable. III. WORDS. Words are articulate sounds, used by common consent, as signs of our ideas.
Page 23 - ... 30. triginta 40. quadraginta 50. quinquaginta 60. sexaginta 70. septuaginta 80. octoginta 90. nonaginta 100. centum 200.
Page 2 - In Latin there are as many syllables in a word, as there are vowels or diphthongs in it ; unless when u with any other vowel comes after g, q, or s, as in lingua, qui, suadeo ; where the two vowels are not reckoned a diphthong, because the sound of the M vanishes, or is little heard.
Page 100 - Verbs agree with the First Person rather than with the Second, and with the Second rather than with the Third. 1. Ego et Cicero valemus.
Page 96 - V.—A pronoun representing words of different persona should agree with the first person rather than with the second, and with the second rather than with the third: thus— 1.
Page 24 - The Comparative is formed from the first case of the positive that ends in i, by adding or for the masculine and feminine, and us for the neuter; as Durus, G.
Page 95 - In order to find out the nominative case, ask the question who, or what ? with the verb ; and the word that answers to the question, is the nominative case to the verb ; as, who reads ? who regards not ? The master reads, but ye regard not.
Page 30 - Mood or Mode is a particular form of the verb, showing the manner in which the being, action, or passion, is represented. There are five moods of verbs, the Indicative, the Imperative, the Potential, the Subjunctive, and the Infinitive.
Page 1 - The consonants are b, c, d,f, g, h,j, k, I, m, n, p, q, r, s, t, v, x, z ; and sometimes to and y.

Bibliographic information