The Ultimate Guide to Classroom Publishing

Front Cover
Pembroke Publishers Limited, 1999 - Children - 152 pages
"Exciting ideas for teaching writing, editing, illustration and design. This practical resource also features author studies, a guide to author visits, fun ways to celebrate books and more" Cf. Our choice, 2000.

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Contents

IV
13
V
14
VI
17
VII
18
IX
19
XII
20
XIII
23
XIV
25
LXVI
87
LXVII
88
LXIX
89
LXXI
90
LXXII
91
LXXV
92
LXXVI
93
LXXVIII
94

XV
29
XVII
30
XVIII
31
XIX
32
XXI
33
XXII
35
XXIII
36
XXIV
37
XXV
38
XXVI
39
XXVII
45
XXIX
46
XXXI
48
XXXII
49
XXXIII
51
XXXIV
52
XXXVI
55
XXXIX
56
XL
57
XLI
63
XLII
65
XLIV
66
XLVI
68
XLVII
71
L
72
LII
74
LIII
75
LIV
76
LVI
77
LVII
79
LX
80
LXI
81
LXII
82
LXIII
85
LXXX
95
LXXXII
96
LXXXIV
97
LXXXVI
101
LXXXIX
102
XC
103
XCII
105
XCIII
106
XCIV
107
XCV
109
XCVII
110
C
111
CI
112
CIII
113
CIV
115
CVII
116
CVIII
118
CX
119
CXI
120
CXII
121
CXV
122
CXVI
125
CXVII
127
CXXI
128
CXXIII
131
CXXIV
133
CXXV
137
CXXVI
139
CXXVII
140
CXXIX
145
CXXX
147
CXXXI
149
Copyright

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Page 71 - You may have tangible wealth untold; Caskets of jewels and coffers of gold. Richer than I you can never be— I had a Mother who read to me.
Page 93 - And, having imagination, it takes you an hour to write a paragraph that, if you were unimaginative, would take you only a minute. Or you might not write the paragraph at all.
Page 32 - To read a writer is for me not merely to get an idea of what he says, but to go off with him, and travel in his company.
Page 13 - What a convenient and delightful world is this world of books! — if you bring to it not the obligations of the student, or look upon it as an opiate for idleness, but enter it rather with the enthusiasm of the adventurer! It has vast advantages over the ordinary world of daylight, of barter and trade, of work and worry. In this world every man is his own King — the sort of King one loves to imagine, not concerned in such petty matters as wars and parliaments and taxes, but a mellow and moderate...
Page 88 - You don't write because you want to say something; you write because you've got something to say.
Page 124 - Project The following rating scale is based on the expectations listed below. 1 — Unsatisfactory 2 — Below expectations 3 — Meets expectations 4 — Exceeds expectations 5 — Outstanding 1. Ideas and Development: The project follows a logical order. It has a beginning and an ending. Ideas are presented clearly. 12345 2. Sentence Structure: Ideas are presented in complete sentences. 12345 3. Punctuation: Capital letters and punctuation are used appropriately.
Page 124 - ... level are spelled correctly. 12345 5. Vocabulary: Words are used to convey meaning. 12345 6. Visuals: Visuals are neat and show detail. 12345 7. Ability to Follow Directions: Directions given for the project were followed. 12345 8. Research: There is evidence of research and/or knowledge of subject. 12345 9. General Appearance: The project is neat and complete. 12345 10. Creativity: The project shows unique or inventive thinking. 12345 Score: 20 - 29 points = 73-79 percent 30 - 39 points = 80-89...
Page 69 - ... trembling fear, so much of the heart's history, that all errors and short-comings are for a while lost sight of in the amiable self-assertion of youth. Authors have a greater right than any copyright, though it is generally unacknowledged or disregarded. They have a right to the reader's civility. There are favorable hours for reading a book, as for writing it, and to these the author has a claim. Yet many people think, that when they buy a book, they buy with it the right to abuse the author....

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