History of the Rise and Influence of the Spirit of Rationalism in Europe, Volume 2

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 81 - Truth indeed came once into the world with her Divine Master, and was a perfect shape most glorious to look on : but when he ascended, and his Apostles after him were laid asleep, then straight arose a wicked race of deceivers, who, as that story goes of the Egyptian Typhon with his conspirators, how they dealt with the good Osiris, took the virgin Truth, hewed her lovely form into a thou,sand pieces, and scattered them to the four winds. From that time ever since, the sad friends of Truth...
Page 81 - Truth, hewed her lovely form into a thousand pieces, and scattered them to the four winds. From that time ever since, the sad friends of Truth, such as durst appear, imitating the careful search that Isis made for the mangled body of Osiris, went up and down gathering up limb by limb still as they could find them.
Page 77 - A man may be a heretic in the truth ; and if he believe things only because his pastor says so, or the assembly so determines, without knowing other reason, though his belief be true, yet the very truth he holds becomes his heresy.
Page 179 - ... till by experience they found this for all parts very inconvenient, so as the thing which they had devised for a remedy did indeed but increase the sore which it should have cured. They saw that to live by one man's will became the cause of all men's misery.
Page 179 - God hath over all: and by the natural law, whereunto he hath made all subject, the lawful power of making laws to command whole politic societies of men belongeth so properly unto the same entire societies, that for any prince or potentate of what kind soever upon earth to exercise the same of himself, and not either by express commission immediately and personally received from God, or else by authority derived at the first from their consent upon whose persons they impose laws, it is no better...
Page 168 - It is at least an historical fact that in the great majority of instances the early Protestant defenders of civil liberty derived their political principles chiefly from the Old Testament and the defenders of despotism from the New.
Page 48 - THE religion of the Papists is superstitious and idolatrous, their faith and doctrine erroneous and heretical, their church, in respect of both, apostatical : to give them therefore a toleration, or to consent, that they may freely exercise their religion, and profess their faith and doctrine, is a grievous sin...
Page 78 - In the mean while, if they suffer themselves neither to be betrayed into their errors, nor kept in them by any sin of their will ; if they do their best endeavour to free themselves from all errors, and yet fail of it through human frailty ; so well am I persuaded of the goodness of God, that if in me alone should meet a confluence of all such errors of all the protestants in the world that were thus qualified, I should not be so much afraid of them all, as I should be to ask pardon for them.

Bibliographic information