The black lane. The palanquin. The forest drive. Morning visits. The bracelet of memory. Blind Kate. The print gallery. The departure

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R. Hunter, and Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1821 - Readers
 

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Page 52 - The sun sets in night, and the stars shun the day; But glory remains when their lights fade away! Begin, ye tormentors! your threats are in vain, For the son of Alknomook shall never complain. Remember the arrows he shot from his bow; Remember your chiefs by his hatchet laid low : Why so slow? — do you wait till I shrink from the pain? No— the son of Alknomook will never complain.
Page 53 - ... shall never complain. Remember the wood where in ambush we lay, And the scalps which we bore from your nation away. Now the flame rises fast ; you exult in my pain ; But the son of Alknomook can never complain. I go to the land where my father is gone, His ghost shall rejoice in the fame of his son : Death comes, like a friend, to relieve me from pain ; And thy son, O Alknomook ! has scorned to complain.
Page 68 - you had yesterday apprized me of your errand, I should instantly have complied with the emperor's request ; but the horse he asks is now no more ; being surprised by your sudden arrival, and having nothing else to regale you with, I ordered him to be killed and served up to you last night for supper.
Page 54 - The Idea of this ballad was suggested several years ago by hearing a gentleman, who had resided many years In America ntnon^ the tribe called the Cherokees. sing a wild air, which he assured me it was customary for those people to chant with a barbarous Jargon, Implying contempt for their enemies In the moments of torture and death.
Page 66 - Well, my love, never mind his name, but let me hear what he says of Hatem," said Mrs. Egerton. " He says, ma'am, that ' his poems expressed the charms of beneficence, and his practice evinced that he wrote from his heart.
Page 53 - The idea of this ballad was suggested several years ago, by hearing a gentleman, who had resided many years in America among the tribe called the Cherokees, sing a wild air, which he assured me it was customary for those people to chant with a barbarous jargon, implying contempt for their enemies in the moments of torture and death. I have endeavoured to give something of the characteristic spirit and sentiment of those brave savages.
Page 72 - Honour rewards the brave and bold alone, She spurns the timorous, indolent, and base ; Danger and toil stand stern before her throne, And guard, so Jove commands, the sacred placed Who seeks her must the mighty cost sustain, And pay the price of fame — labour, and care, and pain.
Page 67 - Hatim's abode in a dark tempestuous night, at a season when all the horses were at pasture in the meadows. He was received in a manner suitable to the dignity of the imperial envoy, and treated that night with the utmost hospitality. The next day the officer delivered to Hatim his message from the Emperor, at which Hatim appeared greatly concerned.
Page 1 - And woe to those who train such youth, And spare to press the rights of truth, The mind to strengthen and anneal, While on the stithy glows the steel...

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