Memoirs of the Most Renowned James Graham, Marquis of Montrose

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A. Constable, 1819 - Scotland - 530 pages

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Page 499 - My case, and read the reason why I can love thee no more. The golden laws of love shall be Upon this pillar hung, — A simple heart, a single eye, A true and constant tongue ; Let no man for more love pretend Than he has hearts in store ; True love begun shall never end ; Love one and love no more. Then shall thy heart be set by mine, But in far different case ; For mine was true, so was not thine, But lookt like Janus
Page 127 - Whether these things will gain credit abroad, or with after ages, I cannot pretend to say ; but I am certain that this narration is taken from the best information and the most credible evidence. And truly I have often heard those who were esteemed the most experienced officers, not in Britain only, but in France and Germany, prefer this march of Montrose to his most celebrated victories.
Page 476 - Parliaments, and the liberties of the kingdoms, and to preserve and defend the King's Majesty's person and authority, in the preservation and defence of the true religion and liberties of the kingdoms, that the world may bear witness with our consciences of our loyalty, and that we have no thoughts or intentions to diminish His Majesty's just power and greatness.
Page 504 - Let them bestow on every airth a limb, Then open all my veins that I may swim To Thee, my Maker, in that crimson lake ; Then place my parboiled head upon a stake, Scatter my ashes, strew them in the air.
Page 501 - That I shall love no more. And when all gallants ride about These monuments to view, Whereon is written, in and out, Thou traitorous and untrue ; Then in a passion they shall pause, And thus say, sighing sore, " Alas ! he had too just a cause Never to love thee more." And when that tracing goddess Fame From east to west shall flee, She shall record it, to thy shame, How thou hast loved me ; And how in odds our love was such As few have been before ; Thou loved too many, and I too much, So I can love...
Page 435 - Ker, for the reasons and manner of my coming to this army ; as also, what my treatment hath been since I came, and my resolutions upon my whole business. This shall, therefore, only give you positive commands, and tell you real truths, leaving the why of all to this bearer.
Page 452 - ... to give the least impediment to your " proceedings, we think fit to let you know, that as we conceive that your " preparations have been one effectual motive, that has induced them to make " the said address to us ; so your vigorous proceeding will be a good means " to bring them to such moderation in the said treaty as probably may " produce an agreement, and a present union of that whole nation in our
Page 495 - Great, good, and just ! could I but rate My griefs, and thy too rigid fate ; I'd weep the world to such a strain, As it should deluge once again ; " But since thy loud-tongued blood demands supplies, More from Briareus' hands than Argus' eyes ; I'll sing thy obsequies with trumpet sounds, And write thy epitaph with blood and wounds.
Page 499 - Which way to scale the wall; Nor balls of wildfire love consume The shrine which I adore; For if such smoke about thee fume, I'll never love thee more.
Page 498 - I'll sing and laugh at thy neglect, And never love thee more. But if thou will be constant then, And faithful of thy word. I'll make thee glorious by my pen, And famous by my sword. I'll serve thee in such noble ways Was never heard before ; I'll crown and deck thee all with bays, And love thee evermore.

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