The juvenile Plutarch, accounts of the lives of celebrated children and of the infancy of persons who have been illustrious for their virtues

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Page 191 - Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow, It shall be still in strictest measure even To that same lot, however mean or high, Toward which Time leads me, and the will of Heaven; All is, if I have grace to use it so, As ever in my great Task-Master's eye.
Page 194 - THREE Poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed; The next in majesty •, In both the last. The force of Nature could no further go ; To make a third, she joined the former two.
Page 183 - Miserable they ! Who, here entangled in the gathering ice, Take their last look of the descending sun ; While, full of death, and fierce with tenfold frost, The long, long night, incumbent o'er their heads, Falls horrible.
Page 159 - Who does not wish that Dryden could have known the value of the homage that was paid him, and foreseen the greatness of his young admirer? The earliest of Pope's productions is his
Page 142 - Whence then comes wisdom? And where is the place of understanding? It is hid from the eyes of all living, and concealed from the birds of the air. Abaddon and Death say, 'We have heard a rumor of it with our ears.
Page 189 - I understood them; others were the smooth elegiac poets, whereof the schools are not scarce, whom both for the pleasing sound of their numerous writing, which in imitation I found most easy and most agreeable to nature's part in me, and for their matter, which, what it is there be few who know not, I was so allured to read that no recreation came to me better welcome.
Page 19 - I therefore told him the name of the Great Being who made him and all the world ; concerning whose adorable nature I gave him such information as I thought he could in some measure comprehend. The lesson affected him greatly, and he never forgot either it, or the circumstance that introduced it.
Page 18 - He had reached his fifth [or sixth] year, knew the alphabet, and could read a little ; but had received no particular information with respect to the Author of his being: because I thought he could not yet understand such information ; and because I had learned from my own experience, that to be made to repeat words not understood is extremely detrimental to the faculties of a young mind.
Page 18 - In a corner of a little garden, without informing any person of the circumstance, I wrote in the mould, with my finger, the three initial letters of his name; and, sowing garden cresses in the furrows, covered up the seed, and smoothed the ground. Ten days after, he came running to me, and with astonishment in his countenance told me, that his name was growing in the garden. I smiled at the report, and seemed inclined to disregard it; but he insisted on my going to see what had happened. Yes...
Page 134 - He very early discovered a propensity to painting. Nature was his teacher, and the woods of Suffolk his academy, where he would pass in solitude his mornings, in making a sketch of an antiquated tree, a marshy brook, a few cattle, a shepherd and his flock, or any other accidental objects that were presented.

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