Logical Foundations for Rule-Based Systems

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 10, 2006 - Computers - 309 pages
Thinking in terms of facts and rules is perhaps one of the most common ways of approaching problem de?nition and problem solving both in everyday life and under more formal circumstances. The best known set of rules, the Ten Commandments have been accompanying us since the times of Moses; the Decalogue proved to be simple but powerful, concise and universal. It is logically consistent and complete. There are also many other attempts to impose rule-based regulations in almost all areas of life, including professional work, education, medical services, taxes, etc. Some most typical examples may include various codes (e.g. legal or tra?c code), regulations (especially military ones), and many systems of customary or informal rules. The universal nature of rule-based formulation of behavior or inference principles follows from the concept of rules being a simple and intuitive yet powerful concept of very high expressive power. Moreover, rules as such encode in fact functional aspects of behavior and can be used for modeling numerous phenomena.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Bibliographic information