A handbook in outline of the political history of England, by A.H.D. Acland and C. Ransome

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Page 194 - ... measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister. Such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her constitutional right of dismissing that Minister. She expects to be kept informed of what passes between him and the foreign Ministers before important decisions are taken, based upon that intercourse ; to receive the foreign despatches in good time ; and to have the drafts for her approval sent to her...
Page 40 - Moreover, we have granted for us and our heirs, as well to archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, and other folk of holy Church, as also to earls, barons, and to all the commonalty of the land, that for no business from henceforth...
Page 170 - An Act to subject certain publications to the duties of stamps upon newspapers, and to make other regulations for restraining the abuses arising from publication of blasphemous and seditious libels.
Page 194 - Having once given her sanction to a measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister; such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her Constitutional right of dismissing...
Page 151 - His Majesty allowed Earl Temple to say that whoever voted for the India Bill was not only not his friend, but would be considered by him as an enemy ; and if these words were not strong enough, Earl Temple might use whatever words he might deem stronger and more to the purpose.
Page 257 - That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid, judges commissions be made quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established; but upon the address of both houses of parliament it may be lawful to remove them.
Page 176 - The credit belongs to others, and not to me. It belongs to Mr. Fox — to Mr. Grattan — to Mr. Plunkett — to the gentlemen opposite, and to an illustrious and right honourable friend of mine who is now no more.
Page 242 - the Bishop of Rome has no greater jurisdiction conferred on him by God in the Kingdom of England than any other foreign bishop.
Page 40 - Parliament assembled, and, besides others, two knights were summoned from each shire, two citizens from each city, and two burgesses from each borough.
Page 124 - Papist at the age of eighteen is to take the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, and subscribe the declaration against transubstantiation...

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