The Young Mathematician's Guide: Being a Plain and Easy Introduction to the Mathematicks ... With an Appendix of Practical Gauging

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S. Birt, 1747 - Mathematics - 480 pages

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Page 467 - The circumference of every circle is supposed to be divided into 360 equal parts, called degrees ; and each degree into 60 equal parts, called minutes ; and each minute into 60 equal parts, called seconds ; and these into thirds, &c.
Page 217 - Man playing at hazard won at the first throw as much money as he had in his pocket ; at the second throw he won 5 shillings more than the square root of what he then had ; at the third throw he won the square of all he then had ; and then he had ill 2. 16.
Page 471 - C' (89) (90) (91) (92) (93) 112. In any plane triangle, the sum of any two sides is to their difference as the tangent of half the sum of the opposite angles is to the tangent of half their difference.
Page 138 - If equal quantities be added to equal quantities, the fums will be equal. 2. If equal quantities be taken from equal quantities, the remainders will be equal. 3. If equal quantities be multiplied by equal quantities, the produits will be equal.
Page 106 - The particular Rates of all the Ingredients propofed to be mixed, the Mean Rate of the whole Mixture, and any one of the Quantities to be mixed being given: Thence to find how much of every one of the other Ingredients is requifite to compofe the Mixture.
Page 90 - If 2 men can do 12 rods of ditching in 6 days ; how many rods may be done by 8 men in 24 days ? Ans.
Page 23 - The original of all weights, used in England, was a grain or corn of wheat, gathered out of the middle of the ear ; and being well dried, 32 of them were to make one pennyweight, 20 pennyweights one ounce, and 12 ounces one pound. But, in later times, it was thought sufficient to divide the same pennyweight into 24 equal parts, still called grains, being the least weight now in common use; and from hence the rest are computed.
Page 470 - In any triangle, the sides are proportional to the sines of the opposite angles, ie. t abc sin A sin B sin C...
Page 180 - When any number of quantities are proportionals, as one antecedent is to its consequent, so is the sum of all the antecedents to the sum of all the consequents.
Page 471 - FG 5 that is in Words, half the Sum of the Legs, Is to half their Difference, As the Tangent of half the Sum of the oppofite Angles, Is to the Tangent of half their Difference : But Wholes are as their Halves ; wherefore the Sum of the Legs, Is...

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