Lowell Leaflets: Poems and Prose Passages from the Works of James Russell Lowell for Reading and Recitation

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Houghton, Mifflin, 1896 - American literature - 102 pages
 

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Page 44 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested. That is, some books are to. be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 102 - New occasions teach new duties ; Time makes ancient good uncouth ; They must upward still, and onward, who would keep abreast of Truth ; Lo, before us gleam her camp-fires ! we ourselves must Pilgrims be, Launch our Mayflower, and steer boldly through the desperate winter sea, Nor attempt the Future's portal with the Past's blood-rusted key.
Page 75 - The Sun's rim dips; the stars rush out, At one stride comes the dark: With far-heard whisper, o'er the sea, Off shot the spectre-bark.
Page 50 - Is true Freedom but to break Fetters for our own dear sake, And, with leathern hearts, forget That we owe mankind a debt? No ! true freedom is to share All the chains our brothers wear, And, with heart and hand, to be Earnest to make others free.
Page 50 - And, looking upward fearfully, he saw Only a wolf that shrank away and ran, Ugly and fierce, to hide among the woods. 1 20 130 STANZAS ON FREEDOM ! whose boast it is that ye Come of fathers brave and free, If there breathe on earth a slave, Are ye truly free and brave 1 If ye do not feel the chain, When it works a brother's pain, Are ye not base slaves indeed, Slaves unworthy to be freed...
Page 19 - THE DANDELION. DEAR common flower, that grow'st beside the way, Fringing the dusty road with harmless gold, First pledge of blithesome May, Which children pluck, and, full of pride, uphold, High-hearted buccaneers, o'erjoyed that they An Eldorado in the grass have found, Which not the rich earth's ample round May match in wealth, — tliou art more dear to me Than all the prouder summerblooms may be.
Page 100 - GREAT Truths are portions of the soul of man ; Great souls are portions of Eternity ; Each drop of blood that e'er through true heart ran With lofty message, ran for thee and me ; For God's law, since the starry song began , Hath been, and still forevermore must be, That every deed which shall outlast Time's span Must goad the soul to be erect and free...
Page 55 - THE FOUNTAIN INTO the sunshine, Full of the light, Leaping and flashing From morn till night; Into the moonlight, Whiter than snow, Waving so flower-like When the winds blow; Into the starlight Rushing in spray, Happy at midnight, Happy by day; Ever in...
Page 67 - Better the blessing of the poor, Though I turn me empty from his door ; That is no true alms which the hand can hold ; He gives nothing but worthless gold Who gives from a sense of duty...
Page 64 - OVER his keys the musing organist, Beginning doubtfully and far away, First lets his fingers wander as they list. And builds a bridge from Dreamland for his lay : Then, as the touch of his loved instrument Gives hope and fervor, nearer draws his theme, First guessed by faint auroral flushes sent Along the wavering vista of his dream.

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