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Dal. Your humblest creature.
Ilut. So, so; the game's a-foot, I'm in cold

hunting,
The hare and hounds are parties.

[Aside. Dal. Princely lady, How most unworthy I am to employ My services, in honour of your virtues, How hopeless my desires are to enjoy Your fair opinion, and much more your love; Are only matters of despair, unless Your goodness gives large warrants to my bold

ness, My feeble-wing'd ambition. Hunt. This is scurvy.

[Aside. Kath. My lord, I interrupt you not.

Hunt. Indeed ! Now on my life she'll court him.-[Asside.]— Nay,

nay, on, sir.

Dal. Oft have I tuned the lesson of my sorrows To sweeten discord, and enrich your pity, But all in vain: here had my comforts sunk And never ris'n again, to tell a story Of the despairing lover, had not now, Even now, the earl your father---

Hunt. He means me sure.

Dal. After some fit disputes of your condition, Your highness and my lowness, given a licence Which did not more embolden, than encourage My faulting tongue.

Hunt. How, how? how's that? embolden? Encourage? I encourage ye! d’ye hear, sir?

[Aside.

A subtle trick, a quaint one.—Will you hear,

man?

What did I say to you? come, come, to th' point.

Kath. It shall not need, my lord.

Hunt. Then hear me, Kate! Keep you on that hand of her; I on this.Thou stand'st between a father and a suitor, Both striving for an interest in thy heart: He courts thee for affection, I for duty; He as a servant pleads; but by the privilege Of nature, though I might command, my care Shall only counsel what it shall not force. Thou canst but make one choice; the ties of mar

riage Are tenures, not at will, but during life. Consider whose thou art, and who; a princess, A princess of the royal blood of Scotland, In the full spring of youth, and fresh in beauty. The king that sits upon the throne is young, And yet unmarried, forward in attempts On any

least occasion, to endanger His person; wherefore, Kate, as I am confident Thou dar’st not wrong thy birth and education By yielding to a common servile rage Of female wantonness, so I am confident Thou wilt proportion all thy thoughts to side Thy equals, if not equal thy superiors. My lord of Dalyell, young

in In honours, but nor eminent in titles [N]or in estate, that may support or add to The expectation of thy fortunes. Settle

years, is old

THE

DRAMATIC WORKS

OF

JOHN F O R D,

IN TWO VOLUMES.

WITH

NOTES CRITICAL AND EXPLANATORY,

BY

W. GIFFORD, Esq.

TO WHICH ARE ADDED

FAME'S MEMORIAL, AND VERSES TO THE MEMORY

OF BEN JONSON.

I, SECUNDO

OMINE!

VOL. II.

LONDON :

JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.

MDCCCXXVII.

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