The life of Samuel Johnson ... including A journal of his tour to the Hebrides. To which are added, Anecdotes by Hawkins, Piozzi, &c. and notes by various hands, Volume 3

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Page 206 - Why, Sir, if you were to read Richardson for the story, your impatience would be so much fretted that you would hang yourself. But you must read him for the sentiment, and consider the story as only giving occasion to the sentiment.
Page 85 - Why, sir, that was because he knew the strange colour would attract crowds to gaze at it, and thus they might hear of him, and see how well he could make a coat even of so absurd a colour.
Page 29 - I desired all to withdraw ; then told her that we were to part forever; that as Christians, we should part with prayer; and that I would, if she was willing, say a short prayer beside her.
Page 85 - Nor public flame, nor private dares to shine; Nor human spark is left, nor glimpse divine Lo, thy dread empire, Chaos ! is restored; Light dies before thy uncreating word : Thy hand, great Anarch, lets the curtain fall, And universal darkness buries all.
Page 201 - But, Sir, in the British Constitution it is surely of importance to keep up a spirit in the people, so as to preserve a balance against the Crown ". JoHNSON : " Sir, I perceive you are a vile Whig. — Why all this childish jealousy of the power of the Crown ? The Crown has not power enough.
Page 252 - On Tuesday, April 13, he and Dr. Goldsmith and I dined at General Oglethorpe's. Goldsmith expatiated on the common topick, that the race of our people was degenerated, and that this was owing to luxury. JOHNSON. " Sir, in the first place, I doubt the fact. I believe there are as many tall men in England now, as ever there were.
Page 225 - I collated such copies as I could procure, and wished for more, but have not found the collectors of these rarities very communicative.
Page 174 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.
Page 247 - History of his Own Times,' is very entertaining. The style, indeed, is mere chit-chat. I do not believe that Burnet intentionally lied ; but he was so much prejudiced, that he took no pains to find out the truth. He was like a man who resolves to regulate his time by a certain watch ; but he will not inquire whether the watch is right or not.
Page 272 - Nay, Sir, I would not have him prove it. If he is content to take his information from others, he may get through his book with little trouble, and without much endangering his reputation. But if he makes experiments for so comprehensive a book as his, there would be no end to them ; his erroneous assertions would then fall upon himself ; and he might be blamed for not having made experiments as to every particular.

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