An Excursion from the Source of the Wye

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Page 23 - Who builds a church to God, and not to Fame, Will never mark the marble with his name : Go, search it there, where to be born and die, Of rich and poor makes all the history ; Enough, that Virtue fill'd the space between ; Prov'd by the ends of being, to have been.
Page 20 - Vaga echoes through her winding bounds, And rapid Severn hoarse applause resounds. Who hung with woods yon mountain's sultry brow ? From the dry rock who bade the waters flow ? Not to the skies in useless columns tost...
Page 38 - Leland says, they were remaining in his time, but dilapidated. The moat was entire, and the four gates standing which he distinguished by the names of " Monk's Gate, Eastern Gate, Wygate, and Monnow or Western Gate.
Page 15 - Tree, covering nearly a quarter of an acre, and forming au orchard of itself, having yielded for many years, from twelve to sixteen hogsheads of Perry. •It is accounted for as follows, — a large branch having broke by the wind, its head fell to the ground, the butt still adhering to the trunk. Some time after it appeared to have struck into the ground, taken root and formed a scion. Willing to humour this lucus...
Page 57 - Strongbow, on account of his strength and skill in archery ; and it is said that his arms were so long that he could touch his knees, when in an erect position, with the palms of his hands. Richard Strongbow married the daughter of Dermot Mac Murchad, King of Leinster.
Page 30 - ... Church, about half a mile from Courtfield, is visited by the curious on account of a sepulchral effigy which, according to tradition, represents the Countess of Salisbury, nurse of Henry V. But this with more probability appears to have been the effigy of Margaret, daughter of Thomas de Mounthermer, and wife of Sir John de Montacute, second son of William, first Earl of Salisbury. That lady being nearly allied to the royal family, the young prince was probably entrusted to her care ; and though...
Page 90 - Feet. Fifth arch, 34 feet; which, with four feet abutment at each end, give the length of the bridge, 372 feet. The first iron bridge formed in England was that of Coalbrookdale: its chord is 100 feet 6 inches. The bridge at Stourport is 150 feet; and that of Sunderland, 236 feet 8 inches. Chepstow labours under an inconveI nience not commonly experienced by situations chosen for the erection of towns —we mean the unusual scarcity of water, particularly iiť <try seasons, when the cisterns are...
Page 89 - Unlike the flabby fish in London sold, A Chepstow salmon's worth his weight in gold; Crimps up delightful to the taste and sight, In flakes alternate of fine red and white. Who would not wish with Chepstow swains to dine, Where salmon swims, the second time in wine! Few other rivers such fine salmon feed, Not Taff, not Tay, not Tyne, nor Trent, nor Tweed.
Page 76 - ... part of the cliff to another, and projecting over the water. The views from here, and from other parts of the impending walls on the river side, seldom fail to produce a chilling throb, as the cautious spectator surveys the rapid current Tashing the foot of the crag, at a considerable depth below . On the left hand, in the southeast corner of this court, is the large round tower or citadel, with its dark and gloomy dungeon underneath, where, hidden from the cheering aspect of the sun, sighed...
Page 88 - ... at this time in Chepstow. There were three other Churches in Chepstow, named after St. Ann, St. Nicholas, and St Ewen ; one of which stood at the lower end of Bridge-street, nearly opposite the house now occupied by Mrs. Bayley ; but not the least vestige of either is now remaining. In Church-street is the Hospital, endowed by Sir Walter Montague, of Pencoed, for the maintenance of poor persons belonging to the parishes of Chepstow and Llanmartin, Near the same, at the upper end of Castle-street,...

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