The Works of Nicholas Rowe, Esq; ...

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J. and R. Tonson, T. Osborne, T. Waller, T. Longman, T. Caslon, C. Corbett, T. Lowndes, W. Nicoll, S. Bladon, and M. Richardson., 1766 - 373 pages
 

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Page 124 - Perhaps, ev'n she may profit by th' example, And teach her beauty not to scorn my pow'r. Glost. This do, and wait me e'er the council sits. [Exeunt Rat. and Cat. My lord, y'are well encountred ; here has been A fair petitioner this morning with us ; Believe me, she has won me much to pity her: Alas! her gentle nature was not made To buffet with adversity. I told her How worthily her cause you had befriended ; How much for your good sake we meant to do, That you had spoke, and all things should be...
Page 142 - To see thee thus, thou know'st not how it wounds me; Thy agonies are added to my own, And make the burden more than I can bear. Farewell Good angels visit thy afflictions And bring thee peace and comfort from above.
Page 102 - How few, like thee, inquire the wretched out, And court the offices of soft Humanity ? Like thee reserve their raiment for the naked, Reach out their bread to feed the crying orphan, Or mix their pitying tears with those that weep ? Thy praise deserves a better tongue than mine, To speak and bless thy name.
Page 142 - Tis all in vain, this rage that tears thy bosom; Like a poor bird that flutters in its cage, Thou beat'st thyself to death. Retire, I beg thee; To see thee thus, thou know'st not how it wounds me; Thy agonies are added to my own, And make the burden more than I can bear.
Page 141 - Here then exchange we mutually forgiveness : So may the guilt of all my broken vows, My perjuries to thee, be all forgotten, As here my soul acquits thee of my death, As here I part without one angry thought, As here I leave thee with the softest tenderness, Mourning the chance of our disastrous loves, And begging Heav'n to bless and to support thee.
Page 307 - To forsake the fine folk of the town ! To think that a beauty so gay, So kind and so constant...
Page 133 - That I had art and eloquence divine, To pay my duty to my master's ashes, And plead, till death, the cause of...
Page 128 - Beyond or love's or friendship's sacred band, Beyond myself I prize my native land: On this foundation would I build my fame, And emulate the Greek and Roman name; Think England's peace bought cheaply with my blood, And die with pleasure for my country's good.
Page 155 - Why thus indulge thy fears ? And in despair, Abandon thy distracted soul to horror ? Cast every black and guilty thought behind thee, And let 'em never vex thy quiet more.
Page 149 - My guard, too, that observed me still so close, Tire in the task of their inhuman office, And loiter far behind. Alas ! I faint, My spirits fail at once — This is the door Of my Alicia Blessed opportunity ! I'll steal a little succour from her goodness, Now while no eye observes me.

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