Sydney Punch Staff Papers

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Page 8 - WOULD that the structure brave, the manifold music I build, Bidding my organ obey, calling its keys to their work, Claiming each slave of the sound, at a touch, as when .Solomon willed Armies of angels that soar, legions of demons that lurk, Man, brute, reptile, fly, — alien of end and of aim, Adverse, each from the other heaven-high, hell-deep removed, — Should rush into sight at once as he named the ineffable Name, And pile him a palace straight, to pleasure the princess he loved...
Page 9 - And another would mount and march, like the excellent minion he was. Ay, another and yet another, one crowd but with many a crest, Raising my rampired walls of gold as transparent as glass, Eager to do and die, yield each his place to the rest...
Page 202 - A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ; Survey the whole, nor seek slight faults to find Where Nature moves, and rapture warms the mind; Nor lose for that malignant dull delight, The gen'rous pleasure to be charm'd with wit.
Page 187 - Heaven's influence scarce can penetrate. In life's low vale, the soil the virtues like, They please as beauties, here as wonders strike.
Page 187 - Tis from high life high characters are drawn ; A saint in crape is twice a saint in lawn : A judge is just, a chancellor juster still ; A gownman learn'd ; a bishop what you will ; Wise if a minister ; but if a king, More wise, more learn'd, more just, more every thing. Court-virtues bear, like gems, the highest rate, Born where Heaven's influence scarce can penetrate.
Page 201 - Tho' learn'd, well-bred ; and tho' well-bred, sincere, Modestly bold, and humanly severe : Who to a friend his faults can freely show, And .gladly praise the merit of a foe?
Page 201 - Though learn'd, well-bred; and though well-bred, sincere; Modestly bold, and humanly severe; Who to a friend his faults can freely show, And gladly praise the merit of a foe? Blest with a taste exact, yet unconfined; A knowledge both of books and human kind...
Page 9 - And, seeing ignorance is the curse of God, Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven, Unless you be possess'd with devilish spirits, You cannot but forbear to murder me.
Page 9 - Nature in turn conceived, obeying an impulse as I; And the emulous heaven yearned down, made effort to reach the earth, As the earth had done her best, in my passion, to...
Page 189 - a son of the forest, a man of the backwoods, a dweller in unquiet and uncouth country, and his songs are accordingly saturated with the strange fitful music of waste, broken-up places.

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