PSYCHOLOGY, OF ELEMENTS OF A NEW SYSTEM OF MENTAL PHILOSOPHY. ON THE BASIS OF CONSCIOUSNESS AND COMMON SENSE.

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Page 259 - For who, to dumb Forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resigned, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing lingering look behind?
Page 144 - It being that term which, I think, serves best to stand for whatsoever is the object of the understanding when a man thinks: I have used it to express whatever is meant by phantasm, notion, species, or whatever it is which the mind can be employed about in thinking; and I could not avoid frequently using it.
Page 163 - AY me ! what perils do environ The man that meddles with cold iron ! What plaguy mischiefs and mishaps Do dog him still with after-claps...
Page 23 - Consciousness is a word used by Philosophers, to signify that immediate knowledge which we have of our present thoughts and purposes, and, in general, of all the present operations of our minds.
Page 117 - Abundant and diversified above All number, were the sources of delight ; As infinite as were the lips that drank ; And to the pure, all innocent and pure ; The simplest still to wisest men the best. One made acquaintanceship with plants and flowers, And happy grew in telling all their names...
Page iii - Psychology ; Or, Elements of a new System of Mental Philosophy, on the Basis of Consciousness and Common Sense.
Page 143 - I suppose that every one will grant that we perceive not the objects that are without us, immediately or of themselves. We see the sun, the stars, and an infinity of objects without us ; and it is not at all likely that the soul sallies out of the body, and, as it were, takes a walk through the heavens to contemplate all those objects.
Page 143 - ... ought to be carefully observed that, in order to the mind's perceiving any object, it is absolutely necessary that the idea of that object be actually present to it. Of this it is not possible to doubt. The things which the soul perceives are of two kinds. They are either in the soul, or they are without the soul. Those that are in the soul are its own thoughts, that is to say, all its different modifications. The soul has no need of ideas for perceiving these things. But with regard to things...
Page 143 - She sees them not, therefore, by themselves ; and the immediate object of the mind, when it sees the sun, for example, is not the sun, but something which is intimately united to the soul ; and it is that which 1 call an idea.
Page 143 - I understand nothing else here but that which is nearest to the mind when we perceive any object. — It ought to be carefully observed that, in order to the mind's perceiving any object, it is absolutely necessary that the idea of that object be actually present to it. Of this it is not possible to doubt.

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