The Monthly magazine, Volume 24

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Page 564 - Day she was dressed in white Silk, bordered with Pearls of the Size of Beans, and over it a Mantle of black Silk, shot with Silver Threads; her Train was very long, the End of it borne by a Marchioness; instead of a Chain, she had an oblong Collar of Gold and Jewels.
Page 53 - I shall with pleasure take upon me to draw this amiable, quiet, deserving, unpretending, Christian and philosophical character, in his epitaph.* There truth may be spoken in a few words : as for flourish...
Page 487 - And the Commanders of His Majesty's Ships of War and Privateers, and other Vessels acting under His Majesty's Commission, shall be, and are hereby, instructed to warn every Vessel which shall have commenced her voyage prior to any notice of this Order, and shall be destined to any Port of France, or of her Allies, or of any other Country at War with His Majesty, or to any Port or Place from which the British Flag as aforesaid is excluded, or to any Colony belonging to His Majesty's Enemies, and which...
Page 103 - Child of the Sun, refulgent SUMMER comes, In pride of youth, and felt through Nature's depth: He comes attended by the sultry Hours, And ever-fanning breezes, on his way; While, from his ardent look, the turning Spring Averts her blushful face; and earth, and skies, All-smiling, to his hot dominion leaves.
Page 418 - Rizio to leave a place of which he was unworthy, and which he had occupied too long. Mary employed tears, and entreaties, and threatenings, to save her favourite. But, notwithstanding all these, he was torn from her by violence, and, before he could be dragged through the next apartment, the rage of his enemies put an end to his life, piercing his body with fifty-six wounds p.
Page 159 - WITH this Ring I thee wed, with my body I thee worship, and with all my worldly goods I thee endow: In the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost.
Page 564 - English fashion, strewed with rushes, through which the queen commonly passes in her way to chapel ; at the door stood a gentleman dressed in velvet, with a gold chain, whose office was to introduce to the queen any person of distinction that came to wait on her ; it was Sunday, when there is usually the greatest attendance of nobility. In the same hall, were the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Bishop of...
Page 487 - ... allowed, to discontinue her voyage and to proceed to some port or place in this kingdom, or to Gibraltar or Malta; and any vessel which, after having been so warned or after a reasonable time shall have been afforded for the arrival of information of this his Majesty's order at any port or place from which she sailed, or which after having notice of this order, shall be found in the prosecution of any voyage contrary to the restrictions contained in this order, shall be captured, and together...
Page 487 - ... that all the ports and places of France and her allies, or of any other country at war with His Majesty, and all other ports or places in Europe, from which, although not at war with His Majesty, the British flag is excluded, and all ports or places in the colonies belonging to His Majesty's enemies, shall, from henceforth, be subject to the same restrictions in point of trade and navigation, with the exceptions hereinafter mentioned, as if the same were actually blockaded by His Majesty's naval...
Page 261 - They are powerful in the field, — successful against their enemies, — impatient of any thing like slavery, — • vastly fond of great noises that fill the ear, such as the firing of cannon, drums, and the ringing of bells ; so that it is common for a number of them, that have got a glass in their heads, to go up into some belfry, and ring the bells for hours together, for the sake of exercise.

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