The History of Ireland, Ancient and Modern: Derived from Our Native Annals, ... , and from All the Resources of Irish History Now Available ...

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J. Duffy, 1872 - Ireland - 774 pages
 

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Page 685 - Britain; and that the King's majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and commons of Great Britain, in parliament assembled, had, hath, and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the crown of Great Britain, in all cases whatsoever.
Page 687 - Fabrice's arms, he never recovered. but expired about eleven o'clock the next morning, in the sixty-eighth year of his age, and the thirteenth of his reign Questions for Examination, \ What was the conduct of the South Sea scheme ? 2 Explain the nature of it, 3.
Page 680 - I must do it justice : it was a complete system, full of coherence and consistency ; well digested and well composed in all its parts. It was a machine of wise and elaborate contrivance ; and as well fitted for the oppression, impoverishment, and degradation of a people, and the debasement, in them, of human nature itself, as ever proceeded from the perverted ingenuity of man.
Page 577 - ... each of the assailants would take up a child and use it as a buckler of defence when they ascended the steps, to keep themselves from being shot or brained.
Page 705 - ... apostatize, yet the cause will live; and though the public speaker should die, yet the immortal fire shall outlast the organ which conveyed it, and the breath of liberty, like the word of the holy man, will not die with the prophet, but survive him.
Page 705 - ... by the arms, inspiration, and providence of the present moment, tell us the rule by which we shall go — assert the law of Ireland — declare the liberty of the land. "I will not be answered by a public lie in the shape of an amendment ; neither, speaking for the subject's freedom, am I to hear of faction.
Page 674 - They were not the effect of their fears but of their security. They who carried on this system, looked to the irresistible force of Great Britain for their support in their acts of power. They were quite certain, that no complaints of the natives would be heard on this side of the water, with any other sentiments than those of contempt and indignation.
Page 705 - ... freedom, am I to hear of faction. I wish for nothing but to breathe, in this our island, in common with my fellow-subjects, the air of liberty. I have no ambition, unless it be the ambition to break your chain, and contemplate your glory. I never will be satisfied so long as the meanest cottager in Ireland has a link of the British chain clanking to his rags: he may be naked; he shall not be in...
Page 392 - Besides this, such horrible and lamentable spectacles there are to behold, as the burning of villages, the ruin of churches, the wasting of such as have been good towns and castles : yea, the view of the bones and skulls of the dead subjects, who, partly by murder^ partly by famine, have died in the fields, as, in truth, hardly any Christian with dry eyes could behold.
Page 761 - My occupation is now of the most unpleasant nature, negotiating and jobbing with the most corrupt people under heaven. I despise and hate myself every hour for engaging in such dirty work, and am supported only by the reflection that without an Union the British empire must be dissolved.

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