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NEW YORK :
MAYNARD, MERRILL, & Co.,

29, 31, AND 33 East NINETEENTH STREET.

Harvard University, KC15? 6? Dept. of Education Library.

Gift of the Publishers.

A COMPLETE COURSE IN THE STUDY OF ENGLISH,

Spelling, Language, Grammar, Composition, Literature.

Reed's Word Lessons-A Complete Speller.
Reed's Introductory Language Work.
Reed & Kellogg's Graded Lessons in English,
Reed & Kellogg's Higher Lessons in English.
Reed & Kellogg's One-Book Course in English.
Kellogg & Reed's Word Building.
Kellogg & Reed's The English Language.
Kellogg's Text-Book on Rhetoric.
Kellogg's Illustrations of Style.

Kellogg's Text-Book on English Literature.

In the preparation of this series the authors have had one object clearly in view-to so develop the study of the English language as to present a complete, progressive course, from the Spelling-Book to the study of English Literature. The troublesome contradictions which arise in using books arranged by different authors on these subjects, and which require much time for explanation in the school. room, will be avoided by the use of the above “ Complete Course."

Teachers are earnestly invited to examine these books.
MAYNARD, MERRILL, & Co., PUBLISHERS,

New York.

TRANSFERRED TO
HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

LIFE OF MACAULAY.

THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY, the great historian of England, was born at Rothley, near Leicester, in 1800, and was named Thomas Babington after his uncle. Macaulay's grandfather was a Scotcb minister, and his father, Zachary, after having spent some time in Jamaica, returned to England, and joined Wilberforce and Clarkson in their efforts to abolish slavery in the British possessions. Macaulay was educated at Bristol and at Cambridge, where hegalued great distinction, and twice won medals for his poems. He was also a member of the Union Debating Society, a famous club where young politicians tried their skill in the discussion of the affairs of State. He took his degree of M.A. in 1825, was called to the bar in 1826, and contributed extensively to Knight's Quarterly Magazine, in which his first literary efforts appeared, including among others the ballads of “The Spanish Armada” and “The Battle of Ivry." In 1825 he contributed to the Edinburgh Review his celebrated article on Milton, and this was succeeded by numerous others on various themes, historical, political, and literary, which were afterward collected and published separately.

Macaulay was a member of Parliament first for Colne, then for Leeds, and took part in the great discussions connecteci with the Reform Bill of 1832. In return for his services to his party, he was sent to India in 1834 as a member of the Council, and while there wrote his famous essays on Lord Clive and Warren Hastings. In 1839 Macaulay returned to England, was elected member for Edinburgh, and, during the eight years of his connection with that city, held successively the offices of Secretary at War and Paymaster-General of the Forces. In 1842 he gave to the world his spirited " Lays of Ancient Rome." In 1847 he displeased his Edinburgh supporters, and in a pet they rejected him; but in 1852 they re-elected him of their own accord, and in this way endeavored to atone for the past. He devoted the interval between these two dates to his History of England, the first two volumes of which were published in 1848, two others making their appearance in 1855. They form a magnificent fragment of historical writing, embracing a period of little more than twelve years, from the accession of James II. to the Peace of Ryswick, in 1397. A fifth volume, compiled from the papers which he left

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