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A reredos of considerable beauty representing the “Last Supper," On Sunday last the Revs. H. P. Goodridge and R. Wilkins, Mr. Wix's is about to be erected in Southgate Church.

Curates, inhibited by Bishop Sumner, again officiated, it being conChrist Church Cathedral, Victoria, was totally destroyed by fire on

sidered that the inhibition expired on the day of the Bishop's resignation. October 1st; the chancel furniture and altar plate alone were saved. At a meeting held at Carnarvon on Friday it was determined to

The Dean of Westminster and Lady Augusta Stanley have arrived in memorialize Mr. Gladstone in favour of appointing a Welsh Bishop to Rome.

the See of St. Asaph, about to become vacant by the retirement of Bishop

Short.
The Pope has had a handsome gold snuff-box forwarded to him from
San Fiancisco.

The Rev. Canon Randall, Vicar of St. Mary's, Redcliff, together with It is proposed to make a determined opposition to the confirmation this Church to the memory of their father. The subject is the Anointing

his brother and sister have placed a beautiful stained glass window in of the election of Dr. Temple in Bow Church.

of our B. Saviour's head at the Supper at Bethany. The Marquis of Salisbury has been elected Chancellor of the University of Oxford, in place of the late Earl of Derby.

The first edition of 5,000 copies of the report and appendix of the

committee on intemperance of the Lower House of Convocation for the The statement which several papers have published that the Marquis Province of Canterbury, has been nearly exhausted in the course of of Bute is about to erect a R.C. Cathedral at Oxford is without foundation. three months. An amended and cheaper edition is contemplated. The Bishop of Durham preached on Thursday at Greatham Church

Bishop Wilberforce, in his recent Charge, stated that during the past on its being reopened after restoration. At a subsequent luncheon he three years he had consecrated 18 new Churches, assisted at the reopening spoke somewhat strongly against Church Conferences.

of 54 restored ones, confirmed 20,288 candidates, and ordained 145 Priests Special Sunday evening Servicees have been commenced in Ripor. and 150 Deacons. Cathedral. The first Service was on Sunday, when the Bishop preached The Thirteenth Annual Octave of Special Services is being held at and the Dean said the Office.

the Parish Church of Clerkenwell. Amongst the preachers is the In honour of the memory of the late Mr. George Peabody, the Bishop Bishop, of London. The subject of the Sermons is “ Paul's Life,” the of London preached a funeral Sermon in Westminster Abbey on Sunday “St.” being studiously omitted in the programme. afternoon.

The Annual Court of the Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy was On Tuesday the Bishop of Lincoln reopened the Church of Bleasby, held on Thursday. The Treasurers reported that during the last year near Southwell, the Ecclesiastical Commissioners having restored the the funds of the Corporation had assisted more than 1,300 individuals, all

in very straitened circumstances. A memorial window is about to be placed in Knowsley Church, where About 1,000 members of the Manchester Conservative Working Men's the late Earl of Derby is buried, by the tenants and servants at Association marched in procession, on Sunday week to St. Ann's Knowsley.

Church, where, at their request, a special Sermon was preached by the pleasure in stating that it has been offered to the Rev. Charles Merivale, of Norwich and

Norfolk have petitioned the Bishop of Norwich to hold Canon Dale has declined the Deanery of Ely. The Times has much Rev. J. Bardsley, on the late Earl of Derby.

Three hundred and fifty-six of the Clergy of the two Archdeaconries B.D., Chaplain to the House of Commons.

a Diocesan Conference. His Lordship however declines, on the ground Dr. Miller and his Churchwardens are taking steps to raise the neces- that he does not think the laity approve of these meetings. sary funds for the substitution of open sittings for the unsightly and inconvenient double pews in the Parish Church of Greenwich.

The official journal of Rome publishes a list of fifteen Bishops who

have arrived for the Council during the last few days. Among the The R.C. Bishops of Germany have issued an address to the faithful, number is Monsignor Dechamps, Archbishop of Malines, a Prelate disurging them to contribute for the establishment of a Catholic Uni- tinguished for his liberal opinions. versity.

Among the arrivals for the Council are Cardinal Bonnechose and six On Friday the Very Rev. H. Goodwin, Dean of Ely, was unanimously other French Bishops, who were received on landing at Civita Vecchia elected Bishop of Carlisle by the Dean and Chapter. His consecration by the Pontifical delegate, and at once conveyed to Rome. The Cardinal will probably take place in York Minster on the Feast of St. Andrews.

has already had an interview with the Pope. About forty of the Clergy at the East-end of London partook of the Pius IX. has been persuaded by the Jesuit Fathers to prepare a Bull Holy Communion on Thursday morning, in the Parish Church of Stepney, which, in case of his death during the sitting of the Council, shall make on the occasion of the inauguration of the Special Services.

known the arrangements he wishes to be carried out, and his instrucThe eighth or eastern-most window in the south aisle of Gloucester tions for the Government of the Church. Cathedral, has been filled with stained glass in memory of the late Licut,

The pinnacles of the Parish Church of Doncaster appear to be in a Col. Sir Harry Darell, Bart.

very insecure state, and a subscription has been set on foot for their Colonel Tempest, the Patron of St. John's Church, Long, near restoration. The cost is estimated at £400, of which Mr. E. B. Denison, Bradford, gives £10 a-year to the choir on condition that they sing no Q.C., has offered to pay half. hymns.

The Rev. C. J. Fynes-Clinton writes, suggesting that an address, as Mrs. Hamilton, mother of the late Bishop of Salisbury expired on numerously signed as possible, should be presented to Bishop Trower Thursday. She was in her 88th year and was present at her son's and the other five members of the Chapter of Exeter, thanking them funeral in Salisbury Cathedral.

for their protest against the election of Dr. Temple. Mr. Charles Mackeson, Editor of the “Guide to the Churches of The Services at the next anniversary of the Eastern Church Association London and its Suburbs,” will deliver his lecture on Church Music at the will be held on Thursday, the 25th instant, in the Chapel of the Russian Established Church Institution, Birmingham, on Thursday evening. Embassy, Welbeck-street, when the Liturgy of St. Chrysostom will be

The Church Association intend to make a statement to the Privy used in English, and an English Sermon preached by the Very Reverend Council to the effect that Mr. Mackonochie has not obeyed the terms of Eugene Popoff, the Chaplain of the Embassy. the Royal monition.

At a meeting of the Church Association, held in Liverpool, one of the The Bishop of Brechin will hold a Retreat for Clergy in Dundee from speakers lachrymosely observed that in a so-called Ritualistic Church in the 23rd to the 26th inst. Communications should be addressed to the that town lately he had authority for saying that there was a congregaRev. J. Nicolson, Dundee.

tion of 500 persons on a Monday morning; whereas in his Church he

should like to get 200 or 250 on Wednesday evenings. The committee of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge have just shown a remarkable degree of bigotry. They have refused even

Provost Fortescue preached on Monday evening at Christ Church, to consider the making a grant towards the new Cathedral at Inverness. Clapham, for considerably over an hour. He told the congregation when

they were tired they could leave the Church ; their doing so would give The Archdeacon of Coventry, with his wife, Lady Erskine, one of his him no offence. Many persons took the preacher at his word, and went daughters, and four of his household, have been laid up with low fever

out. Indeed it was a continual going in and out. at Alvechurch Rectory.

An Episcopal Church has been erected at the corner of Clinton and Three Bishops of the Syriac rite have arrived at Rome, and Cardinal Livingston-streets, Brooklyn, New York, at a cost of 350,000 dollars, Barnabo, the prefect of the Propaganda, asserts that they have come to about £75,000 English. The Sermon at the Inaugural Service was Rome to be reconciled to her Communion.

preached by Bishop McIlvaine, of Ohio. Bishop Potter and Bishop Immediately after his installation in his Cathedral as Bishop of Salis- Littlejohn also took part in the Service. bury, his Lordship was installed Prebendary of Potterne, which is held in commendam with the Bishopric.

At a "Liberation ” Meeting on Wednesday evening, Mr. Miall, M.P.,

said, "Though Mr. Gladstone might not be with the Society to the full Mr. Westerton, so notorious for his opposition to the progress of Church extent of the objects they contemplated, yet he (Mr. Miall) expected work at St. Barnabas, Pimlico in years gone by, has addressed a letter to that ultimately, through that great statesman, they would obtain all they the Times denouncing the Twelve Days' Mission.

desired !"

We (Guardian) learn, and we are sure the Bishop of Lincoln will rejoice before the Court. Mr. A. Charles applied that the defendant should be to learn, that the Government have addressed a communication to the dismissed from the suit, as the Bishop of Winchester had resigned. The Archbishop of Canterbury to the effect that, in such cases as may be matter stands over for argument. judged suitable, they will not refuse to consider the application to a Diocese of the Act of Henry VIII. for the appointment of Suffragan that his Monks were in a state of starvation, Indeed, he would be glad

Father Ignatius told his congregation at Store-street Hall on Sunday, Biskops.

of some bread for them to sustain life. It was humiliating to thus The Mission Movement set on foot by the High Church Clergy appears plead, but then, the Rev. gentleman reminded his hearers, the Order to to have somewhat awakened the Low Church party to a sense of their which he belonged had been spoiled and robbed, and their former duties. Hence in addition to the Services to be held in Islington we splendid patrimonies now were held by the Dukes of Beaufort, Bedford, find that the Clergy of Southwark, and the Vicar of Greenwich intend and others. But such was the zeal of those who had joined the Brotherholding Special Services and Prayer Meetings during the season of hood that they would rather starve at their posts than return to the Advent.

world. He did not plead for himself but for others. He could get A new Musical Society in Oxford, bearing the title of “The Oxford sufficient. Vocal Union ” has recently been established. It consists of the entire adult portion of the Choirs of Christ Church Cathedral, Magdalen and Christ Church, St. George's-in-the-East, is quietly doing real Church

A correspondent writes to us:-" The Rev. J. M Conechy, Vicar of New Colleges, and is under the Presidency of Archdeacon Clarke, Sub- work here. A choir, at present unsurpliced, has been formed, the offerDean of Christ Church, and the conductorship of Mr. Hamilton Clarke, tory introduced, Saints' Days duly observed, and an Early. Celebration Mus. Bac., organist of Queen's College.

twice a month. Most heartily has be entered into the Mission Services. The boarded partition which has divided the nave from the other part There is a Daily Celebration at seven a.m., Matins at eight, followed by of Melton Church during the restoration, has now been taken down, Instructions and Meditations. Short Services in the schoolrooms every throwing the whole interior of the Church open. This (says the Leicester evening; and Evening Prayer, Sermons, Instructions, and Meditations Journal) shows out the beauty of the Church to great advantage, and in the Church at eight every evening. In addition to all this a prayer those who have not witnessed it can scarcely conceive the beautiful effect meeting is held in a room in every street in the district at nine p.m.” which the clearing out of the galleries, &c., has had.

The restoration of the Parish Church of Lathbury, Newport Pagnell, The late Bishop of Exeter gave to the county of Cornwall a valuable has been completed and was reopened on the 4th. On the walls of the theological library, on condition that within three years of his demise a nave are some interesting remains of twelfth-century frescoes, and the room suitable for its reception should be provided. A large and hand- handsome marble pavement, which extends over the whole of the some structure is now being erected at Truro, and is intended as a chancel, is 200 years old. The font, the tiles, and the window near the memorial to the deceased Bishop. It will be used as a depository for font, are the gifts of the Rector's wife, Mrs. Bull. The altar-cloth and the Christian Knowledge Society, as well as for purposes of the library. pulpit-hangings, very beautiful specimens of mediæval embroidery, are

the work of the Sisterhood of the Holy Trinity at Oxford. The The See of Winchester was declared vacant at the Privy Council on kneeling-cushings in the chancel, which are exceedingly handsome, are Thursday. The Sussex Express states that the Bishop of Oxford met the gift of the Misses Bull, the Rector's daughters. his future Archdeacons, and the sons of Bishop Sumner, at Farnham Castle on Monday, that the Archdeacon of Berkshire will be his

As far as we can learn from accounts sent us by numerous corresponExamining Chaplain in his new Diocese, and that the Rev. Ernest dents the “ Twelve Days' Mission” is an undoubted success. Nearly all Wilberforce will be his Domestic Chaplain.

the Churches at which the Services are being held are crowded. At the

mid-day Services at St. Ethelburga's and St. Lawrence, Jewry, numbers The Rev. J. J. Merest has been cited to appear at the Arches Court at have been unable to get inside the doors. At St. Alban's, Holborn, St. the instance of the Bishop of Worcester, in whose Diocese he held a pre- Paul's, Lorrimore-square, Christ Church, Clapham, and All Saints, ferment, on an application to admit articles for simony in the sale of a Lambeth, Services are being held from early morn till late at night. At Living, and also on a conviction for libel, to which he pleaded guilty, and the eight o'clock Service at Christ Church, Clapham, where the Rev. entered into his own recognizance. Sir R. Phillimore, in admitting the Provost Fortescue is preaching the Mission, there is no standing room, articles, said they raised a grave question as to the removal of a Clergy- and it is the same at St. Paul's, Lambeth, where the Rev. Luke man, and he would appoint a day for the hearing.

Rivington is conducting the Services. A meeting has been recently held at Ashby Magna, Leicestershire,

The new Church of St. Paul's, Cannes, was opened last Saturday week under the auspices of the Bishop of Peterborough, to take into considera- by the Bishop of Gibraltar. The site of the Church, given by the tion the question of compulsory education. Various papers were read, Countess of Oxford, is on the Boulevard du Cannes, at the eastern side and a resolution was carried recognizing the importance of some legis- of this favourite watering-place. The design of the Church was lative action for ensuring the more general attendance of children at furnished by Mr. G. G. Scott. As yet only the nave is built, having the school. School prize schemes were also discussed, and a sub-committee appearance of a neat and plain Chapel. A set of altar plate was prewas appointed to prepare the details of a scheme for the Archdeaconry of sented by Mr. T. Woolfield. At the opening Service the Church was Leicester,

decorated with evergreens and flowers. The 84th, 122nd, and 132nd At the Church of St. Luke, Great Crosby, near Liverpool, were put Psalms were chanted instead of the Psalms for the day. The Holy up last week two splendid memorial windows, by Capronnier, of Brussels. Eucharist was celebrated, and the Bishop preached. The Offertory (for These windows are beautifully executed; the colours being most delicate. building fund) amounted to over 700. The subject of the larger one, erected by Richard Houghton, Esq., of

The Pope has ordered “ Acts” to be prepared for the canonization of Sandheys, Waterloo, in memory of two members of his family, is, "The Eugenius III. and Urban V. Eugenius is the Pope to whom St. Adoration of the Magi." The smaller window was erected by E. B. Bernard, in the twelfth century, addressed his famous treatise, "De Con, Bright, Esq., to the memory of his wife, and represents “Our Blessed sideratione,” in which he advised the renouncement of the temporal Lord raising Jairus's Daughter."

power. Eugenius died at Tivoli on the 7th of July, 1153, and is buried Last Wednesday a meeting was held at Sion College to prosecute an in the vaults of the Vatican. As soon as the process is taken out for the appeal to the Court of Common Pleas against the late decision of the canonization, the tomb will be opened, and the faithful will be admitted Revising Barrister for Middlesex, which will have the effect of disfran- to adore his remains. Urban V. was one of the Avignon Popes, and, chising nearly 12,000 beneficed Clergymen. Lord George Hamilton, though he made a flying visit to Rome, passed his pontificate under the M.P., presided, and a large number of Clergymen and others attended. ægis and on the soil of France. It was unanimously agreed that the appeal should be prosecuted, and the

A number of parochial elections have taken place in Dublin and all circulars stating the particular points raised, and embodying the resolu

over the country. The vestry at Grangegorman was very excited. tions, should be issued, soliciting co-operation.

There were cries of “Down with Ritualism, “We will have no more The death is announced of the Rev. Wm. Harness, Incumbent of All Maturins.” Delegates of ultra-Puritan opinions were chosen, and the Saints, Knightsbridge, and Prebendary of St. Paul's. Mr. Harness, who following resolution was carried :—" That, in the opinion of this meeting, was in his eightieth year, was on a visit to his former Curate, the Dean the large gilt cross, the stone cross, the vases of flowers, and the images of Battle, and in descending a stone staircase fell, and died almost fixed above the Communion-table, together with the fantastic drapery of instantaneously. He was a schoolfellow, and afterwards an intimate the table itself, are amongst the innovations which have alienated the friend, of Lord Byron. He was for many years Incumbent of Regent parishioners from their Church, and that a deputation be hereby appointed square Chapel, St. Pancras, and was appointed Clerical Registrar by from this meeting to wait on the Incumbent and request him to Lord Lansdowne. He afterwards undertook to build the Church of All remove these innovations from our Protestant Church without delay. Saints', Knightsbridge, and was himself the principal contributor.

The Bishop of London, accompanied by his Chaplain and by Mrs. In the Court of Arches on Wednesday the articles were admitted in Jackson and two of his daughters, paid a formal visit, as President, to the case of "Elphinstone v. Purchas.” The defendant did not appear. the Boys' Home, in the Regent's-park-road, near Primrose-hill, on Friday The Judge admitted them pro forma, except the 37th charging him with afternoon, for the purpose of inaugurating a new wing which has been pausing after the words “departed this life in thy faith and fear,” in the added to the buildings. At the end of a short form of prayer, which was Prayer for the Church Militant, which he disallowed, as he did the 40th prepared for the occasion, a hymn was sung, and the Bishop addressed to article referring to certain publications which the Court could not recog- the boys a few kind words, urging them to look on work as their duty nize. The case of " The Bishop of Winchester v. Wix” was likewise 1 and the best means of giving them a start in life. A collection was made which amounted to nearly 251. The boys who compose the band of the The following is from a British newspaper:-“ An extraordinary Home afterwards played a selection of music, and the Bishop dismissed scene took place yesterday at a funeral at Arno's-vale Cemetery. the visitors with the Benediction.

Last week the Rev. J. L. Lovekin, who has for some months past officiA “Churchman ” writes to the Guardian:-"I have attended Service ated as Chaplain to the St. Augustine's Home, Montpelier, died rather at Peterborough Cathedral when there has been neither Bishop, Dean, suddenly, and it was determined to celebrate the funeral obsequies

The funeral cortéye was Canon, Minor Canon or any other Clergyınan connected with that according to the highest forms of Ritualism. Church present, and when the officiating Minister was a young man in very plain until it passed within the gates of the cemetery, when Prior Deacon's orders. On seeking an explanation for so great an irregularity, Cyprian and the choristers by whom he was accompanied robed themit was explained to me that the bulk of the work is usually done by the selves, and formed in procession, a cross-bearer, carrying a crucifix, and masters of the Grammar and Training Schools, and that during their two acolytes, with lighted candles, preceding them. The Rev. J. B. vacations, a neighbouring Curate is engaged to take their places. In Riddle, the Chaplain of the cemetery, protested against the use of the consequence of the well-paid Clergy doing all in their power to make crucifix and the candles, and intimated that if they were not removed themselves appear, in the eyes of the laity, like rich sinecurists, the state that in the event of his doing so he would perform the service himself

.

he should decline to proceed with the Service. Prior Cyprian threatened of Church feeling in the city is at the very lowest ebb, and it is not to be wondered at that the Dissenters increase rapidly in numbers and Some altercation ensued, which led to the Chaplain unrobing, and the influence."

Rev. gentleman was about to leave the ground when a relative of the

deceased interfered, and it was arranged that the crucifix and candles An American correspondent writes :—The impending Roman Council, should be removed some distance from the grave. The Chaplain then the Ritualistic demonstrations in the Episcopal Church, both in England proceeded with the Service, and at its conclusion the acolytes assembled and America, and the arrival on our shores of Father Hyacinthe, are round the grave with the cross and candles, nd several hymns were creating a prodigious sensation in the religious world. The late bare- sung." footed Carmelite is today the most famous man in this country. His rooms, at one of the leading hotels in New York, have been thronged Communion persons who have not previously given in their names to

The Rev. A. H. Mackonochie bas given notice that he will not admit to with men and women anxious to pay their respects and have a look at the lion of the hour; the papers are calling him the worthy successor of and handed to the Churchwarden, who will admit to the chancel at the

one of the Clergy. “The names thus given in will be entered in a book Luther and Huss and Fénelon; and a translation of his Notre Dame Communion only those whose names he has received. This enforcement Sermons will appear in a volume just as soon as the types can do their of the Church's regulation has been called for by the fact of strangers duty. In the meantime, the Priest declares that he has not quitted the having been frequently seen in the Church, behaving with great levity Roman Catholic Church ; but has a broken only with the tyranny in during Service, then at the time of Communion getting up to leave the that Church.” And the photographers are selling his portrait by the Church, at the door turning round, and, having conferred with one thousand.

another, finally gone up to communicate. These and other like acts of The Mission at the East-end seems to have commenced well. In nearly irreverence (some worse than these) have constrained me to fall back every Church in each parish daily and special Services are being held, upon the Church's remedy for the evil. I hope faithful Christians who including, in most cases, a celebration of Holy Communion. The eight may find that Service the most convenient Service at which to commuo'clock Evening Services attract large congregations chiefly of the poorer nicate will not grudge the trouble of complying with the Rubric, when classes. The Services are in many cases supplemented by prayer meet- they see that the object of its enforcement is to protect both the Sacraings, classes, &c., in the schools. At St. Peter's, London Docks, the ment of God and the souls of the thoughtless from profanation. There Services on Sunday were as usual. During the afternoon the Vicar went will always be some who find that they can best communicate fasting and out in the streets of his parish, accompanied by some of the choir with a in a devout frame of mind at a late hour, owing to the keenness of the processional cross, and most affectionately invited the people to attend in morning air and many other circumstances. For them clearly a mid-day the evening. They did so beyond expectation. A stirring Sermon was Communion is intended, and not for sight-seers; and they, I am sure, preached by the Rev. R. Twigg, and many, at the conclusion, went over will gladly help to protect the Sacrament.” to the Mission-room to engage in prayer. No less than ten Services take place at St. Peter's each day. We notice, however, that the Rectors of Ruri-decanal Conference in Shoreditch, on Thursday, for the purpose of

The Bishop of London's Diocesan Association of Lay Helpers held a St. George's and Whitechapel have made no alteration in their Services ; devising means

for drawing out lay help in the respective parishes to aid and also that at St. Jude's, Whitechapel, there is a daily evening Com- in Church work during the coming winter. The Rev. J. P. Pownall, munion at four p.m.—Correspondent.

Rural Dean, attended, and explained the advantages derived in the parish All Saints' Church, Marston, after a thorough restoration, has been of St. John's, Hoxton, from combining all the helpers in the twenty-one reopened by the Archbishop of York, his Grace preaching the Sermon spheres of work into one parochial association, both in strengthening and celebrating the Holy Communion on the occasion. Nearly 100 of and systematizing the work, and in increasing the efficiency and the the neighbouring Clergy were present, vested in surplices, and the Service numbers of the helpers. The Bishop had affiliated it with the Diocesan was chorally rendered by the choir of the Church, assisted by several of Association, and thus afforded them moral support of no little value, the choir of York Minster. In the interior the work has been very Commander William Dawson, R.N., read a paper on “The Need of Lay extensive. The chancel is paved with encausti: tiles. New seats of pine Help and How to Draw it Out.” The Paper was warmly discussed by have been erected throughout the nave, aisle, and transept. The chancel the Conference, and various plans suggested both for rearing lay help is fitted with oak stalls. The pulpit is very elaborate; it is of alabaster, from all ranks of society, and for enlisting the spare hours of young elegantly carred. The lectern is of brass. A new altar of oak has been men in business, and of the artizan class. All agreed that it was made, and the altar-rails are of metal—brass on illuminated iron impossible to reach the non-church-going masses except by individualistandards. The east window is of three lights, and is filled in with zing agency, and that chiefly on Sundays; whilst it was equally stained glass by Hardman, of Birmingham. The subject is in connec- impossible for the Clergy alone, even if increased tenfold, to reach tion with All Saints, to which the Church is dedicated; the centre figure all their parishioners of all ages and ranks in any of the larger represents our Saviour in glory, surrounded by saints and angels. The parishes. The Diocesan Association of Lay-Helpers invited every window is the gift of Col. Akroyd, M.P. for Halifax, whose ancestor was Lay Churchman to enrol himself as a labourer, requiring no a Priest of Marston in the fifteenth century. The cost of the restoration entrance-fees and no subscriptions, but simply personal 'service in may be stated at £1,500.

| parochial work. Applications for work to be made to the Parochial On Saturday morning the new Bishop of Salisbury was enthroned in Clergy, or by letter to the Bishop's Chaplain, the_Rev. F. H. Fisher, his Cathedral with the usual ceremonies. The procession on its way to London House, S.W., or to C. B. P. Bosanquet, Esq., 8, Lansdownethe Cathedral stopped at the Choir School, when the Senior Chorister road, W. delivered a congratulatory address in Latin. The Bishop replied in The Mission at All Saints', Lambeth, commenced after Evensong on Latin, of which the following is a translation :-" The greeting with Sunday. The Priest kneeling at the altar, with cross and taper bearers, which, youths beloved in Christ, you have welcomed me on my and precentors kneeling at the steps of the chancel, sang a Litany of undertaking the office of Bishop in this most celebrated Church, is very Penitence, after which the Rev. J. Edwards, who is canducting the Misacceptable to me. For having been for many years engaged with boys, I sion, ascended the pulpit and preached the Sermon. He has chosen as gladly recognise the voice, the look, the modesty of boys. Nor, indeed, are his subject God's great love to man. This is the preacher's theme, our duties altogether dissimilar ; for which of us is not bound to turn all the founded on the Epistle for the week. We were made sons of God at powers of his mind and body to the honour of God, and the benefit of Baptism, but man could not understand this. All baptized people did the holy mother the Church? Your lot, indeed, seems to me especially not live Christian lives--the majority did not-yea the great majority of blest; you, with whose voices the very roof of the neighbouring Church Church-going people did not, and so the Sceptic and the Infidel pointed continually rings; who pass your youth in constant prayers, in singing to these professed Christians, to the profligate and the drunkard, and the praise of God, amidst everything that is beautiful and holy. Only said, “Do you call that man regenerate, a child of God, a member of may God grant that we praise with such true faith that our voices prove Christ.”. Yes, he answered, by virtue of his Baptism he is such, and it not mere tinklings of a cymbal. You have called me father, and have was to bring these back to the fold that earnest-minded men had set this wakened up the memory of that excellent and deeply-regretted Prelate Mission on foot. This evening Mr. Edwards will preach on the subject in whose footsteps I now, however unworthily, tread. I promise you of Purity and the great means of attaining this virtue, namely, by the that, keeping his example before my eyes, I will maintain the same , Sacrament of Penance and Confession. The singular earnestness of the fatherly love towards you which he always maintained."

preacher rivets the attention of all his hearers. The daily Services at this Church are a celebration of the Holy Communion at half-past seven, THE TWELVE DAYS' Mission.-For the following description of the followed by Matins and Instruction; at mid-day, Litany; at seven, inaugural Services of the Mission at St. Alban's, Holborn, and St. Evensong; at eight o'clock, the Mission Service, consisting of a Litany Paul's, Lorrimore-square, we are indebted to the Record:-Describing in procession ; kneeling in front of the altar, Collects and Versicles, the the Service at the first named Church it says :—"There was a large Miserere-sung alternately by the precentor and congregation—then the congregation. The altar candles lighted at Morning Prayer were now Magnificat, the Sermon, and hymns. In addition to this there are extinguished, but there were seven burning lamps across the chancel. classes for private instruction, and the Priests can be seen at all times in The Sermon was long and earnest, its subject being the power of prayer, the vestry by those who wish for advice. We regret to hear that the enforced by sacrifice. The Prayer of Consecration was the culminating continued illness of the Vicar of this Parish prevents his taking part point of the Service. It must have been said in whispered tones by the in these Services.

Priest, who with his two assistants stood before the altar in green and REPORTING AT THE COUNCIL.—Some experiments have been made in gold yestments. Admid the silence the bell tolled, and presently the the enclosure in St. Peter's to test its acoustic capabilities. Shorthand choir broke the apparent pause with their melody-the words they sang writers were placed in the reporters' seats, and some English, French, we could not tell. Then the Priests turned and faced the people, German, and Spanish scholars rose at different points and delivered Latin standing for some time on the altar steps, one holding distinctly to view speeches with the pronunciation of their respective countries. It was

a consecrated wafer, the other the cup. Next ten or twelve ladies, and, found that the speaker nearest the altar could be heard at the greatest as far as we could see, one layman out of the hundreds present, came distance, and accordingly this spot is chosen for the tribune. But even

forward to communicate. Two or three, who advanced, were sent back here the result was not satisfactory, and there is now a talk of covering from the chancel-rail, not having signified their intention on the previous the enclosure with a glass ceiling. This acoustic question has divided the day. Afterwards the Mass proceeded to its close in the manner which Court of Rome into two factions, one contending that all the debates

we have described on former occasions.—Another of the prominent should take place in St. Peter's, the other declaring for the Saloon of the stations of the Mission is St. Paul's, Lorrimore-square. Here the Supper or the Sistine Chapel.-Pall Mall Gazette.

commencing Service was delayed till the evening; but it was preceded LARGE SECESSION FROM THE ENGLISH CHURCH UNION.—The Church by a highly Ritualistic Service in the morning, at which incense was Times thus alludes to the large Tory Secession from

this organization:- burnt, and

the Mass celebrated by three officiating Clergymen in their "Two years ago the number of members and men-associates was 3,595; altar, on which stood a large cross and some_flowers. Immediately

gorgeous robes. Seven suspended lights were burning in front of the last year the number of recruits was 1,407; but the number who had before the evening Sermon, a hymn entitled “The Litany of the Holy disappeared from the roll through death, neglect to pay subscriptions, or Ghost," from the People's Hymnal, was sung in procession, the choir, voluntary retirement was 346; so that the net increase was 1,061. preceded by an acolyte bearing a cross, passed down the north aisle, and the number on the books 4,656. This year the number of and back to the altar by way of the middle aisle. The officiating Clergyrecruits is stated to have been 1,500 ; but so far as we can judge from

men marched in the rear of the procession. The whole of the members the appearance of the Directory itself, the gross number is not more than 5,200 ; so that the net increase cannot have been much over 500, the altar while singing the first stanza of the Litany. The Sermon

of the choir, together with the Clergymen, prostrated themselves before instead of 1,100, as it onght to have been according to the data of the

was preached from the words, • Render unto God the things that are previous year. Of course, if we are wrong in this calculation we shall God's," (Matt. xxii., 21). The instruction class followed the Sermon, and be glad to be set right. But assuming that it is correct, the result would

was well attended. The doctrine of the Real Presence was maintained seem to be that at least 600 persons have been withdrawn during the by Mr. Rivington, who, in his cassock and with smooth-shaven face, year."

looked as nearly as possible like a Roman Priest (!!) In conclusion ho THE Saxon CHURCH IN WORTH, Sussex.—The following com- exhorted all to attend these instructions, as every evening a different munication appears in the Builder :-“I have just now returned subject would be chosen. Among others he hoped to talk especially to from visiting orth Church-that was ; Worth ruin that is ! them of the duties of self-examination and confession. An elaborate I found the chancel had vanished clean away, and six or seven rough programme of the intended Services is issued. In it Mr. Rivington men were picking away with large picks at the strong plaster over the states that he may be seen for advice and confession in the vestry every stubble work of the Saxon walls ! Their heavy blows resounded like evening from six to seven. The Clergymen of the parish may be seen sacrilege all about the venerable pile. In my sorrow I called out to the at any time.” head workman, What are you doing picking off that plaster? You'll have to put it all on again; and you can't make anything half so good

THE POPES' LETTER TO ARCHBISHOP MANNING.— The following is a as that ! Oh, no! we shan't put any more on,' said he: we shall ; oint translation of a letter addressed by the Pope to Archbishop Manning :down the stones.' Point them down !' I exclaimed ; 'that rough work “Venerable Brother --Health and the Apostolic Blessing. Having said was never meant to be shown; it was always plastered over.' It was in the letter which we addressed to you, Venerable Brother, on the fourth afterwards mentioned to me that more than one of the Saxon pilasters was out of the upright, and would have to be taken down and rebuilt! day of September last, that subjects which had already been carefully Pray do what you can to prevent further damage. This curious and examined and decided by an Ecumenical Council could not again be interesting Church does not belong to Worth only, but the whole called in question, that therefore no place could be given in the approachcountry, and ought to be preserved intact with the greatest care." ing Council for any defence of errors which had been condemned, and

THIE BISHOP OF LINCOLN'S PASTORAL LETTER.--A Pastoral Letter, of that for this reason we could not have invited non-Catholics to a discuswhich the following is a copy, has just been issued by the Bishop of sion, we now learn that some of those who dissent from our faith have Lincoln :-My brethren of the Clergy and the Laity – I am happy to so understood those words as to believe that no way is left open to them be able to inform you that Her Majesty's Government, with the advice of making known the difficulties which keep them separated from the of His Grace the Archbishop of this Province, has signified to me its Catholic Church, and that almost all approach to us is cut off. But so readiness to comply with my request for the appointment of a Suffragan far are we, the Vicar upon earth, although unworthily, of Him who came Bishop of this Diocese. I need hardly remind you of the reasons for to save that which was lost, from repelling them in any way whatever which this request was made. The Diocese of Lincoln is the most that we even go forth to meet them, and nothing do we seek for with a extensive of all the Dioceses of England but one, and it contains about more ardent wish than to be able to stretch out our arms with a father's 1,000 Clergy; and in the words of my revered predecessor, “ If a Bishop love to any one who shall return to us. And never, certainly, have we of Lincoln desired to visit all the parishes in the Diocese, and to spend a wished to impose silence upon those who, misled by their education, and Sunday in each, it would take him fifteen years to make the circuit.” believing their opinions to be right, think that their dissent from us rests Consequently at our Lay Conference held at Lincoln, on Thursday, upon strong arguments which they would wish to be examined by wise July 29th, it was unanimously agreed, that in default of the Subdivision and prudent men. For although this cannot be done in the Council

, of the Diocese, it was desirable that a Suffragan should be appointed. there will not be wanting learned divines, appointed by ourselves, to I hope it may be distinctly understood that I do not regard the appoint- whom they may open their minds, and may with confidence make known ment of a Suffragan as a measure equally beneficial with the division of the reasons of their own belief ; so that even out of the contest of a this diocese, and the erection of an independent See for the county of discussion, undertaken solely with a desire of finding out the truth, they Nottingham; but inasmuch as the appoinment of a Suffragan requires may receive a more abundant light to guide them to it. And may very no new Legislation, but may be effected at once by means of a statute many propose this to themselves, and carry it out in good faith! For it already in force, and inasmuch as such an appointment will, I believe, could not be done without great profit to themselves and to others; to be found eventually to be the most effectual means for the attainment of themseves indeed, because God will show His face to those that seek Him what we all regard as a necessary end, the Subdivision of this vast ; with their whole heart, and will give them what they long for; to others, Diocese, I therefore feel very grateful to Her Majesty's Government for because not only the example of eminent men cannot fail of its efficacy, their ready concurrence and

co-operation in a measure which I earnestly but also the more diligently they shall have laboured to obtain the benefit hope and pray may, with the Divine blessing, be not only productive of of truth the more earnestly will they strive to impart the same benefit to great spiritual benefit to our own Diocese, but be marked as a new era the rest. Earnestly praying

the God of Mercy for this most happy issue, in the history of the Church of England. I rejoice also to have this we desire you to receive, Venerable Brother, the Apostolic Blessing, opportunity of thanking you publicly, my dear friends, for the very which, as a token of the Divine favour and of our own especial goodmany and great kindnesses that I have received at your hands since my will, we most lovingly grant to you and to your whole Diocese. Given consecration to the See of Lincoln. May God's blessing be with you! – at St. Peter's, in Rome, on the 30th day of October, 1869, in the 24th I am, your faithful servant in Christ, C. LINCOLN. year of our Pontificates.

POPE Pius IX.”

A

FAMOUS LONDON MERCHANTS.

JAMES HOGG AND SON'S ANNOUNCEMENTS.

BOOKS RECENTLY PUBLISHED. " Mit Gott für König und Vaterland."

NEW WORK BY THE REV.T. PELHAM DALE, M.A. BISMARCK'S BOOK.

LIFE'S MOTTO. Illustrated by In One Vol., demy 8vo.,

Biographical Examples. “Whatsoever thy hand THE LIFE OF COUNT BISMARCK: PRIVATE AND POLITICAL.

findeth to do, do it with thy might." With a Frontis.

piece by J. D. WATSON. IVith Descriptive Notices of his Ancestry.

Black and gold binding, gilt top. Price 5s.

CITY PRESS.-" The illustrations of the LIFE'S MOTTO By Dr. GEORGE HESEKIEL. Translated by KENNETH R. H. MACKENZIE, F.S.A., F.A.S.L., are admirable, and the book is one which few can read Translator of “Lepsius's Letters from Egypt,"

without being both interested and instructed." And Co-Translator of “Humboldt's Correspondence with Varnhagen von Ense, " &c. With upwards of One Hundred Ilustrations by Diez, Grimm, Pietsch, and Others.

THE RISE OF OUR GREAT CITY MERCHANTS. PRELIMINARY ANNOUNCEMENT.

With Portraits of George Peabody,-Sir Richard This work contains a complete and trustworthy In the second part, an historical sketch of his ancestry

Whittington-Sir Thomas Gresham, Sir Hugh Mydaccount of the personal and political career of Count is presented, together with a description of the armorial delton, ---Sir Josiah Child, Paterson, Founder of ihe Otto von Bismarck, the distinguished Premier of bearings of the family. Then follows the history of his Bank of England, -Coutts, the Banker,--and 17 other Prussia. It has been carefully prepared from authen- early youth and education, with the commencement of Illustrations. By H. R. FOX BOURNE, Author of tic documents by Dr. George Hesekiel, the well-known his political life at Frankfort and Paris. The later * Merchant-Princes of England," &c. German author, and is profusely illustrated by eminent portions of the work contain his political and private Black and gold binding, gilt edges. Price 3s. 6d. German artists.

correspondence,-almost forming an autobiography - CITY PRESS.-"The plan of the book is excellent. In its English form the translator has endeavoured and refer to those measures which h ve rendered him

A series of famous merchants are brought under to preserve the spirit of the German original, and so celebrated throughout the European continent. The

notice; and, as the story of each is set forth, care is ronder it an acceptable and standard historical work. stirring events of the Danish and Austrian campaigns, taken that the background of the picture shall be well Some notes of an explanatory character have also been culminating in so remarkable a triumph for Prussia

Alled in, so as to supply a record not only of the doings added where it appeared advisable, with notices of the and North Germany, will be found in the concluding of the individuals themselves, but of those by whom principal noble families whose members were coad- part.

they were surrounded. The volume is well got up, jutors or opponents of Bismarck. The arrangement Dr. Hesekiel has approached the subject with a

and has the advantage of being copiously illustrated." of the work comprises an account of Schönhausen, spirit of candour, mingled with due admiration for the

OBSERVER---"Few books have greater interest for the birth-place and family mansion of Count Bismarck. acts of this remarkable man.

[In December. boys than those which tell of the rise to wealth and greatness of the great City merchants.

Mr.

Fox Bourne has made a very excellent and instructive In fcap. 8vo., cloth, price 28. 6d.

work from the materials at his disposal ; and many a

boy dreaming of greatness and wealth in the futuro A HANDY BOOK OF REFERENCE AND QUOTATION.

will read these memoirs with pleasure, and with an

earnest desire to emulate the examples of thrist and MOTTOES AND APHORISMS FROM SHAKESPERE:

industry which they set forth." A selection of nearly Two Thousand Seven Hundred be traced at one and the correct quotation (with tho Mottoes and Aphorisms from Shakespere, with a name of the play, act, and scene) given without going

NEW WORK BY THE REV. PREBENDARY copious Index of upwards of Nine Thousand References further. This is not simply a key to Shakespere, but

JACKSON. to Words and Ideas. The wbole is numbered and

and arranged alphabetically,--so that any word or idea can useful for quotation and reference. [Next weck.

dotes, &c., of Celebrated Preachers, from the Fourth

Century of the Christian Era to the Present Time. By In fcap. 8vo., cloth, price 28. 60.

THOMAS JACKSON, M.A., Probendary of St. Paul's

Cathedral, and Rector of Stoke Newington, London. THE RULES OF RHYME; A Guide to VERSIFICATION.

Black and gold binding, gilt top price 5s. With a Compendious Dictionary of Rhymes.

OXFORD UNIVERSITY HERALD.--"* This is a very

valuable work, containing an immense amount of illBY TOM HOOD.

formation, conveyed in the most attra ctive form. We

can recommend it as being both instructive and inter. This guide to English Versification will give the such as, being archaic and Shakesperoan, will be only esting, and also as being a very desirable addition to strict rules and correct rhymes for that style of com- available for exceptional use; and those which will

the ecclesiastical literature of the present day." position, touching upon the peculiar requisites of song- simply answer the purpose of comic verse. Classical writing, and the necessities of comic and burlesque measures will be examined, with a view to their verse. The Dictionary of Rhymes will distinguish adaptability to English verse, taking into consideration between such words as are admissible in serious verse; the relations of quantity and accent. [In November. prehensivo Summary of Arctic Exploration, Dis

covery, and Adventure, including Experiences of Captain Penny, the Veteran Whaler, now

first published, OUR COLONIES AND EMIGRATION.

With Portraits of Sir John Franklin,---Captain Penny, Dedicated by Permission to the Right Honourable Earl Granville, K.G., Secretary of State for teen other Illustrations. By JOHN TILLOTSON.

Dr. Elisha Kent Kane-Dr. Isaac I. Hayes,--and fourthe Colonies.

Black and gold binding, gilt edges. Price 38. 6d. In One Vol., crown 8vo., price 6s.

ATHENÆUM.—"A fairly written and concise sumTHE STORY OF

mary, . containing & stirring account of the OUR COLONIES.

several voyages of Captain Penny, and of his advenWITH SKETCHES OF THEIR PRESENT CONDITION.

tures with shoals of whales."

FUN.-"A book that cannot but be popular with BY H. R. FOX BOURNE,

boys. Mr. Tillotson has epitomised very ably all the Author of " Famous London Merchants," " English Seamen under the Tudors," &c.

accounts of Arctic adventure." In this work, the chief incidents in the History of the Mother Country, and their “ Importance as Fields

EDINBURGH COURANT.-" We could scarcely imkthe Colonial Possessions of Great Britain will be de- of Emigration." Our North-American and West-Indian

gine a better or more enjoyable book for boys than tailed and some account given of their Present Circum- Settlements, the Australian Colonies, and our other

this. It consists of stories, adventures, and illustrastances, with a view of illustrating both their Value to possessions, will be described in turn.

tions --with this advantage, that the stories are all [Nearly ready.

instructive, and the adventures actually took place, and the illustrations are all from real life.

.. It will In One Vol., crown 8vo.,

almost infallibly chain the attention." THE NATURAL-HISTORY ANECDOTE-BOOK. ILLUSTRATIVE OF INSTINCT AND SAGACITY IN THE ANIMATED KINGDOM.

the Author of “Lives of Eminent Men, &c. With numerous Woodcuts of Animals, Birds, Insects, Reptiles, &c.

Black and gold binding, gilt edges. Price 38. 6d. In this book will be found a most varied and interand in quarters not generally thought of—to shed

Chap. I. The Soldier-Pioneer. esting collection of Anecdotes in Natural History- abroad the cheering influences which sympathy and

II. Pioneers of Enterprise and Daring perhaps the most comprehensive collection ever drawn kindness cannot fail to impart. In no better way, it was

III. Exploring Pioneers. togethe Besides affording instructive, an

in many
considered, could this be effected than by drawing

IV. Peaceful Pioneers. instances humorous, reading on one of the most plea- together well-authenticated instances of the Remark

V, Trading Pioneers, sant subjects to which the attention of both old and able Habits, the atural Pecnliarities, and the Myste

VI. Settling Pioneers. young can be profitably directed, the aim has beer o rious Existences, traceable in greater or losser degrees

VII. The Pioneers of Faith. show how much lies within the power of all--in a way through all classes of Animal Creation.

With Portraits of Dr. Livingstone. -Captain Clapperton-William Penn.-Captain Cook, --Lord Robert

Clive,--Captain Flinders, --Rev. Henry Martyn,-and THE SHORT OR EASY WORD SERIES,

Ten other Page Illustrations.

ART JOURNAL.- This is a most agreeable book, Demy Square 16mo., cloth, gilt edges, price 1s. 64. each.

well and sensibly written."

DAILY TELEGRAPH.-" It is a good little book." I.

II.

FUN.-" In PIONEERS THE SWALLOWS OF LEIGH FARM;

OF CIVILISATION, Messrs
PICCIOLA;

Hogg follow up their book of Arctic exploration, and
A STORY FOR CHILDREN.
Or, The Prison Flower and the Lesson it Taught. the boys of a larger growth.'

continue a series which will delight our boys, and even By the Editor of “ The Book of Children's Hymns and Rhymes."

BY THE REV. F. W. B. BOUVERIE,

Auth
WITH TWELVE ILLUSTRATIONS.

of Short Stories for Short People," &c.

*** A Catalogue of Choice Illustrated Books (Ready.

for young readers, suitable for School Prizes, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS.

&c., will be forwarded on application. London: York Street, Covent Garden, W.C.

London: JAMES HOGG and SON.

PIONEERS OF CIVILISATION. By

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