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testimony of Jesus who are wandering in dens and caves. Farewell my children; study holiness in all your ways, and praise the Lord for what he hath done for me, and tell all my Christian friends to praise him on my account. Farewell sweet Bible, and wanderings and contendings for truth. Welcome death, welcome the city of my God, where I shall see him, and be able to serve him eternally, with full freedom; welcome blessed company, the angels and spirits of just men made perfect. But above all, welcome, welcome, welcome, one glorious and alone God, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost ; into thy hands I commit my soul, for thou art worthy. Amen.

Nota.—That all these Scriptures, set down at full length with this (") mark at the beginning of the line, were all, by the worthy martyr, book, chapter, and verse, cited.

AN APPENDIX RELATED AND ATTESTED BY SOME OF HIS INTIMATE

ACQUAINTANCE THAT WERE EYE AND EAR WITNESSES TO HIS MARTYRDOM.

This valiant Christian, and faithful courageous martyr for truth, John Nisbet in Hardhill, with whom we were many years familiarly acquaint, was a strict observer of the Sabbath, a great examiner of the Scriptures, a great wrestler in prayer, reserved alway as to his own case and soul's concernment; nor did many know how it was with him as to that till he came to prison. Notwithstanding he was always ready to contend for truth when it was opposed, (which he usually termed precious,) and had Scripture ready at all times to back what he spoke, either directly or by necessary consequence to the purpose in hand. He had three sons, who seemed then to follow their father's footsteps; but we know not well what became of them since the Revolution. After he wrote this his last speech, he was taken out immediately to the Council, and from that to the place of execution; all the way thither he had his eyes lifted up to heaven, his face shined visibly, he seemed to rejoice, but spoke little till he came to the scaffold. When he came there, he jumped up on it, and cried out, “My soul doth magnify the Lord, my soul doth magnify the Lord ; I have longed these sixteen years to seal the precious cause and interest of precious Christ with my blood. And now, now he hath answered and granted my request, and has left me no more ado but to come here and pour forth my last prayers, sing forth my last praise to him in time on this sweet and desirable scaffold, mount that ladder, and then I shall quickly get home to my Father's house, see, enjoy, serve, and sing forth the praises of my glorious Redeemer, for ever more, world without end." Then he resumed the heads of his last testimony to the truth, and enlarged upon what he owned and what he disowned. But drums were always caused be beat when he spoke to the people, which you are sure deprived us much of the satisfaction that otherwise we might have had; yet over this difficulty we heard him say, “ The covenanted God of Scotland hath a dreadful storm of wrath provided, which he will surely pour out suddenly and unexpectedly like a thunder-bolt upon these covenanted lands, for their perfidy, treachery, and woeful apostacy; and then men shall say, They have won well away that got a scaffold for Christ.” He exhorted all to make much use of Christ for a hiding-place, for blood, blood, blood, shall be the judgment of these lands. He sang the first six verses of the 34th psalm, and read the eighth to the Romans. He prayer divinely with great presence of mind, and very loud; but for noise of drums, as hath been said, we could not distinctly hear what he either spoke or prayed, except when his face was toward the place where we stood, so that in such disturbing circumstances this is all of his scaffold speech that we could safely gather. He went up the ladder rejoicing and praising the Lord, which we all evidently saw. Thus he died, 4th December 1685, the fifty-eighth year of his age, with the full assurance of his interest in the ever blessed

Lord Jesus Christ; as also of the Lord's returning to this poor land to raise up the fallen tabernacle of David therein in a more remarkable way and manner than ever, which sight he saw afar off by faith, and rejoiced thereat.

RARE SOUL-STRENGTHENING

AND

COMFORTING CORDIAL

FOR

OLD AND YOUNG CHRISTIANS:

BEING

AN EXACT ACCOUNT OF THE AUTHOR'S EXPERIENCE IN

THE FOLLOWING PARTICULARS :

1. AN ACCOUNT OF SOME EXERCISES OF SOUL HE MET WITH IN HIS PILGRIMAGE. II. WHAT STRANGE AND REMARKABLE PROVIDENCES HE WAS TRYSTED WITH,

AND MANY OF THEM THE RETURN OF PRAYER.
III. SOME TEXTS OF SCRIPTURE WHICH HAVE BEEN THE SUBJECT-MATTER OF

SWEET MEDITATION TO HIS SOUL.
IV. HIS LAST AND BEST ADVICE TO HIS CHILDREN AND GRANDCHILDREN.

Come and hear, all ye that fear God, and I will declare what he hath done for my soul.”—Psalm lxvi. 16.

I will utter dark sayings of old: which we have heard and known, and our fathers have told us. We will not hide them from their children, showing to the generations to come the praises of the Lord,8c.—Psalm lxxviii. 2-7.

BY JOHN STEVENSON,
LAND-LABOURER IN THE PARISH OF DAILY IN CARRICK,

WHO DIED IN THE YEAR 1728.

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