Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

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A. S. Barnes Company, 1916 - Readers - 344 pages
 

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Page 57 - I have been lately informed by the proprietor of ' The World,' that two papers, in which my ' Dictionary ' is recommended to the public, were written by your lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge. " When, upon some slight encouragement, I first visited your lordship, I was overpowered, like the rest of mankind, by the enchantment of your...
Page 328 - Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuff 'd bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart ? Doct.
Page 140 - I understand he was reserved, and might appear dull in company; but surely he was not dull in poetry.
Page 184 - The first time I was in company with Foote was at Fitzherbert's. Having no good opinion of the fellow, I was resolved not to be pleased ; and it is very difficult to please a man against his will. I went on eating my dinner pretty sullenly, affecting not to mind him. But the dog was so very comical, that I was obliged to lay down my knife and fork, throw myself back upon my chair, and fairly laugh it out.
Page 200 - When Goldsmith was dying, Dr. Turton said to him, " Your pulse is in greater disorder than it should be, from the degree of fever which you have : is your mind at ease ?" Goldsmith answered it was not.
Page 78 - Johnson told me, that he went up thither without mentioning it to his servant, when he wanted to study, secure from interruption ; for he would not allow his servant to say he was not at home when he really was. ' A servant's strict regard for truth, (said he) must be weakened by such a practice.
Page 336 - OATS [a grain which in England is generally given to horses, but in Scotland supports the people].
Page 58 - ... should consider me as owing that to a Patron, which Providence has enabled me to do for myself. Having carried on my work thus far with so little obligation to any...
Page 158 - ... some degree of care and anxiety. The master of the house is anxious to entertain his guests ; the guests are anxious to be agreeable to him ; and no man, but a very impudent dog indeed, can as freely command what is in another man's house, as if it were his own. Whereas, at a tavern, there is a general freedom from anxiety. You are sure you are welcome ; and the more noise you make, the more trouble you give, the more good things you call for, the welcomer you are. No...
Page 127 - Sir, you surely will not rank his compilation of the Roman History with the works of other historians of this age ?

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