Montesquieu und die Verantwortlichkeit der Räthe des Monarchen in England, Aragonien, Ungarn, Siebenbürgen und Schweden : (1189 - 1748)

Front Cover
Avenarius, 1901 - 168 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 33 - ... the matters to be established for the estate of the king and of his heirs, and for the estate of the realm and of the people, should be treated, accorded, and established in parliament, by the king, and by the assent of the prelates, earls, and barons, and the commonalty of the realm, according as had been before accustomed.
Page 12 - Je suppose trois définitions, ou plutôt trois faits : l'un, que « le gouvernement républicain est celui où le peuple en corps, ou seulement une partie du peuple, a la souveraine puissance ; le monarchique, celui où un seul gouverne, mais par des lois fixes et établies ; au lieu que, dans le despotique, un seul, sans loi et sans règle, entraîne tout par sa volonté et par ses caprices ». Voilà ce que j'appelle la nature de chaque gouvernement.
Page i - FROM THE J.HUNTINGTONWOLCOTT FUND GIVEN BY ROGER WOLCOTT [CLASS OF 1870] IN MEMORY OF HIS FATHER FOR THE "PURCHASE OF BOOKS OF PERMANENT VALUE, THE PREFERENCE TO BE GIVEN TO WORKS OF HISTORY, POLITICAL ECONOMY AND SOCIOLOGY
Page 15 - ... in a battle or a siege. It was regarded as no disparagement for the daughter of a Duke, nay of a royal Duke, to espouse a distinguished commoner. Thus, Sir John Howard married the daughter of Thomas Mowbray Duke of Norfolk.
Page 118 - De minoribus rebus principes consultant, de maioribus omnes, ita tarnen, ut ea quoque, quorum penes plebem arbitrium est, apud principes pertractentur.
Page 26 - Car il est clair que dans une monarchie, où celui qui fait exécuter les lois se juge au-dessus des lois, on a besoin de moins de vertu que dans un gouvernement populaire, où celui qui fait exécuter les lois sent qu'il y est soumis lui-même, et qu'il en portera le poids. Il...
Page 15 - A peculiarity equally important, though less noticed, was the relation in which the nobility stood here to the commonalty. There was a strong hereditary aristocracy; but it was of all hereditary aristocracies the least insolent and exclusive. It had none of the invidious character of a caste. It was constantly receiving members from the people and constantly sending down members to mingle with the people. Any gentleman might become a peer. The younger son of a peer was but a gentleman.
Page 15 - Pedigrees as long, and scutcheons as old, were to be found out of the House of Lords as in it. There were new men who bore the highest titles. There were untitled men well known to be descended from knights who had broken the Saxon ranks at Hastings and scaled the walls of Jerusalem.
Page 15 - ... regarded as no disparagement for the daughter of a duke, nay of a royal duke, to espouse a distinguished commoner. Thus, Sir John Howard married the daughter of Thomas Mowbray Duke of Norfolk. Sir Richard Pole married the Countess of Salisbury, daughter of George Duke of Clarence.
Page 15 - It had none of the invidious character of a caste. It was constantly receiving members from the people and constantly sending down members to mingle with the people. Any gentleman might become a peer. The younger son of a peer was but a gentleman. Grandsons of peers yielded precedence to newly made knights.

Bibliographic information