The Mechanics' Magazine, Museum, Register, Journal, and Gazette, Volume 28

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M. Salmon, 1838 - Industrial arts
 

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Page 462 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 9 - Bradley's discoveries of the aberration of light and the nutation of the earth's axis, the photographic measurement of the heavens, Schwabe's work on the sunspot period, and Mr.
Page 160 - ... he takes it with him into a room, and turns a machine enclosed in a cylindrical case, at the top of which is an electrometer, a small fine pith ball; a wire connects with a similar cylinder and electrometer in a distant apartment; and his wife, by remarking the corresponding motions of the ball, writes down the words they indicate; from which it appears that he has formed an alphabet of motions. As the length of the wire makes no difference in the effect, a correspondence might be carried on...
Page 34 - ... paddle of a canoe. As six of the paddles are raised from the water, six more are entered, and the two sets of paddles make their strokes of about eleven feet in each evolution.
Page 214 - ... the squares of the periodic times are as the cubes of the distances from the common centre, the centripetal forces will be inversely as the squares of the distances.
Page 34 - The crank of the axis acts upon the paddles about one-third of their length from their lower ends, on which part of the oar the whole force of the axis is applied. The engine is placed in the bottom of the boat about onethird from the stern, and both the action and reaction turn the wheel the same way.
Page 164 - I fancy when asked to exchange them for metallic ones, many persons would express themselves content, rather " to bear the ills they have, than fly to others which they know not of.
Page 160 - ... a wire connects with a similar cylinder and electrometer in a distant apartment ; and his wife, by remarking the corresponding motions of the ball, writes down the words they indicate : from which it appears that he has formed an alphabet of motions. As the length of the wire makes no difference in the effect, a correspondence might be carried on at any distance : within and without a besieged town, for instance ; or for a purpose much more worthy, and a thousand times more harmless, between...
Page 35 - Well, gentlemen, although I shall not live to see the time, you will, when steamboats will be preferred to all other means of conveyance, and especially for passengers ; and they will be particularly useful in the navigation of the river Mississippi.
Page 45 - ... electricity, such as an increase of the thickness of the glass, or by substituting for the small knob of the jar a large ball. But the arrangement which produces the greatest effect, is that of a long fine copper wire insulated, parallel to the horizon, and terminated at each end by a small ball. When sparks are thrown on this from a globe of about a foot in diameter, the wire, at each discharge, becomes beautifully luminous from one end to the other, even if it be a hundred feet long ; rays...

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