The Works of Laurence Sterne ...

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W. Strahan, J. Rivington and Sons, J. Dodsley, G. Kearsley, T. Lowndes, G. Robinson, 1780
 

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Page 147 - I believe, an' please your Reverence,' said I, 'that when a soldier gets time to pray, he prays as heartily as a parson, though not with all his fuss and hypocrisy. ' " — " Thou shouldst not have said that, Trim," said my Uncle Toby, "for God only knows who is a hypocrite and who is not. At the great and general review of us all, Corporal, at the Day of Judgment (and not till then), it will be seen who have done their duties in this world and who have not; and we shall be advanced, Trim, accordingly.
Page 28 - tis terrible no way — for consider, brother Toby, — when we are — death is not; — and when death is — we are not.
Page 140 - ... twill be. enough to give your honour your death, and . bring on your honour's torment in your groin.
Page 142 - I get better, my dear, said he, as he gave his purse to his son to pay the man, we can hire horses from hence. But alas, the poor gentleman will never get from hence, said the landlady to me, for I heard the death-watch all night long ; and when he dies, the youth, his son, will certainly die with him, for he is broken-hearted already. I was hearing this account...
Page 136 - Tis for a poor gentleman, — I think, of the army, said the landlord, who has been taken ill at my house four days ago, and has never held up his head since, or had a desire to taste...
Page 146 - Twas well said of thee, Trim, said my uncle Toby. But when a soldier, said I, an' please your reverence, has been standing for twelve hours together in the trenches, up to his knees in cold water — or engaged...
Page 138 - Has he a son with him, then ? said my uncle Toby. — A boy, replied the landlord, of about eleven or twelve years of age ; but the poor creature has tasted almost as little as his father : he does nothing but mourn and lament for him night and day. He has not stirred from the bed-side these two days.
Page 135 - IT was some time in the summer of that year in which Dendermond was taken by the Allies, which was about seven years before my father came into the country, — and about as many after the time that my uncle Toby and Trim had privately decamped from my father's house in town, in order to lay some of the finest sieges to some of the finest fortified cities in Europe; — when my uncle Toby was one evening...
Page 139 - Trim ! said my uncle Toby, I have a project in my head, as it is a bad night, of wrapping myself up warm in my roquelaure, and paying a visit to this poor gentleman.
Page 143 - But alas! the poor gentleman will never get from hence, said the landlady to me, — for I heard the death-watch all night long; — and when he dies, the youth, his son, will certainly die with him; for he is broken-hearted already. I was hearing this account...

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