The Poetical Works of John Milton, Volume 1

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MacMillan, 1904
 

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Page 23 - Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams, or, from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Page 9 - Hurled headlong flaming from the ethereal sky, With hideous ruin and combustion, down To bottomless perdition, there to dwell In adamantine chains and penal fire, Who durst defy the Omnipotent to arms.
Page 10 - That durst dislike his reign, and, me preferring, His utmost power with adverse power opposed In dubious battle on the plains of Heaven, And shook his throne. What though the field be lost ? All is not lost — the unconquerable will. And study of revenge, immortal hate, And courage never to submit or yield ; And what is else not to be overcome ? That glory never shall his wrath or might no Extort from me.
Page 109 - Rising or falling still advance his praise. His praise, ye Winds, that from four quarters blow, Breathe soft or loud ; and wave your tops, ye Pines, With every plant, in sign of worship wave.
Page 154 - Half yet remains unsung, but narrower bound Within the visible Diurnal Sphere. Standing on Earth, not rapt above the pole, More safe I sing with mortal voice, unchanged To hoarse or mute, though fallen on evil days, On evil days though fallen, and evil tongues. In darkness, and with dangers compassed round, And solitude ; yet not alone, while thou Visit'st my slumbers nightly, or when Morn Purples the East.
Page 290 - For God is also in sleep ; and dreams advise, Which he hath sent propitious, some great good Presaging, since, with sorrow and heart's distress Wearied, I fell asleep : but now lead on — In me is no delay : with thee to go, Is to stay here ; without thee here to stay, Is to go hence unwilling ; thou to me Art all things under heaven, all places thou, Who for my wilful crime art banish'd hence.
Page 54 - O'er bog or steep, through strait, rough, dense, or rare, With head, hands, wings, or feet pursues his way, And swims or sinks, or wades, or creeps, or flies.
Page 94 - With charm of earliest birds; pleasant the sun, When first on this delightful land he spreads His orient beams, on herb, tree, fruit, and flower, Glistering with dew; fragrant the fertile earth After soft showers; and sweet the coming on Of grateful evening mild: then silent night, With this her solemn bird, and this fair moon, And these the gems of heaven, her starry train...
Page 109 - Of Nature's womb, that in quaternion run Perpetual circle multiform, and mix And nourish all things, let your ceaseless change Vary to our great Maker still new praise.
Page 21 - At which the universal host up-sent A shout, that tore hell's concave, and beyond Frighted the reign of Chaos and old Night. All in a moment, through the gloom, were seen Ten thousand banners rise into the air, With orient colours waving : with them rose A forest huge of spears ; and thronging helms Appear'd, and serried shields in thick array Of depth immeasurable...

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