Journal of the British Archaeological Association, Volume 9

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British Archaeological Association., 1853 - Archaeology

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Page 268 - But the Nightingale, another of my airy creatures, breathes such sweet loud music out of her little instrumental throat, that it might make mankind to think miracles are not ceased. He that at midnight, when the very labourer sleeps securely, should hear, as I have very often, the clear airs, the sweet descants, the natural rising and falling, the doubling and redoubling of her voice, might well be lifted above earth, and say, " Lord, what music hast thou provided for the Saints in Heaven, when thou...
Page 23 - Within a niche, nigh to its pinnacle, Twelve saints had once stood sanctified in stone; But these had fallen, not when the friars fell, But in the war which struck Charles from his throne, When each house was a fortalice — as tell The annals of full many a line undone, — The gallant cavaliers, who fought in vain For those who knew not to resign or reign.
Page 24 - The mansion's self was vast and venerable, With more of the monastic than has been Elsewhere preserved : the cloisters still were stable, The cells, too, and refectory, I ween : An exquisite small chapel had been able, Still unimpair'd, to decorate the scene ; The rest had been reformed, replaced, or sunk, And spoke more of the baron than the monk.
Page 15 - To Norman Abbey whirl'd the noble pair, — An old, old monastery once, and now Still older mansion, — of a rich and rare Mix'd Gothic, such as artists all allow Few specimens yet left us can compare Withal : it lies perhaps a little low, Because the monks preferr'da hill behind, To "shelter their devotion from the wind.
Page 153 - A solemn League and Covenant for reformation and defence of religion, the honour and happiness of the King, and the peace and safety of the three kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland.
Page 25 - Amidst the court a Gothic fountain play'd, Symmetrical, but deck'd with carvings quaint — • Strange faces, like to men in masquerade, And here perhaps a monster, there a Saint : The springgush'd through grim mouths, of granite made, And sparkled into basins, where it spent Its little torrent in a thousand bubbles, • Like man's vain glory, and his vainer troubles.
Page 15 - Before the mansion lay a lucid lake Broad as transparent, deep, and freshly fed By a river, which its soften'd way did take In currents through the calmer water spread Around : the wild fowl nestled in the brake, And sedges, brooding in their liquid bed ; The woods sloped downwards to its brink, and stood With their green faces fix'd upon the flood.
Page 142 - Kings, to Tyburn, and hanged on the gallows there from nine in the morning till six at night, and then buried under that fatal and ignominious monument in a deep pit ; thousands of people who had seen them in all their pride being spectators.
Page 141 - Colonel Hutchinson privately discoursing with his cousin about the communications he had had with the king, Ireton's expressions were these : " He gave us words, and we paid him in his own coin, when we found he had no real intention to the people's good, but to prevail by our factions, to regain by art what he had lost in fight.
Page 137 - I went to Charing Cross to see Major-General Harrison hanged, drawn, and quartered ; which was done there, he looking as cheerful as any man could do in that condition.

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