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of soil, as the object of planting it out was rather to obtain additional room in the green-house, than any ulterior view with respect to its flowering. About ten years ago, the plant began to appear in a more thriving state ; and, during the last four years, it made rapid advances towards maturity. At the latter end of last June, when the flower-stem made its first appearance, the plant was 7 ft. 2 in. high ; the diameter of the trunk, at 1 ft. 8 in. from the ground was 2 ft. 3 in.; and the leaves 7 ft. 3 in. long, 13 in. wide, and from 5 in. to 6 in. thick near the base; its rapid growth during the last four years is, most likely, owing to the roots having penetrated into a subsoil more congenial to its growth than the soil in which it was planted. Allowing the plant to be about 25 years old when turned out, it may be considered as being about 56 years old when it flowered. Its site was in the flower-garden, on a border sloping to the south, backed with a fence and shrubbery as shown in the sketch, where it never had any protection, otherwise than by being screened from the north by the shrubbery behind.

“ Indications of its blossoming appeared towards the latter end of June, when I perceived that the central leaves were bursting open; and, being gratified at the idea of seeing it in bloom, I was determined to particularly observe the growth of the flower-stem, and accordingly kept a daily journal of its progress. During the first 10 or 12 days, it grew from 6 in. to 7 in. in 24 hours: afterwards its daily growth gradually diminished; and, when approaching its extreme height, its progress was not more than 1 in. during the above period: cloudy weather or a fresh breeze invariably retarded its growth. On the 1st of July, the flower-stem was 10 ft. 11 in. high, and by many it was at that time thought to resemble a gigantic asparagus. On the 19th of July, its height was 16 ft.; and from that period, at about 4 ft. or 5 ft. below the top, lateral buds began to make their appearance, which, as the stem grew, formed the peduncles on which the clusters of flowers expanded. On the 31st of July, the flower-stalk was 19 ft. high, when there were 13 lateral and alternate shoots thrown out. On August 15. there were 22 peduncles put forth, differing in length in proportion to their age, the lower ones measuring 2 ft. 6 in. in length, and bearing on their extremities numerous clusters of flower-buds; these subdividing, and giving space for each individual Aower, and measuring across the clusters from 14 in. to 18 in. At this period, the height of the stem was 22 ft. 6 in. On the 7th of September, the flower-stem attained its extreme height, namely, 25 ft. ; and the number of peduncles was 34, besides a cluster of flower-buds on the top of the stem. The first flower-buds began to expand on the 28th of September, and on the 10th of October the lowermost clusters were in great perfection. The flowers on the whole plant were carefully counted, and the number amounted to 5088, of the colour of sulphur, and above 5 in. in length. So richly were the flowers charged with a juice resembling the taste of honey, that it dropped from them in abundance, especially from about 9 o'clock in the morning until about 12 o'clock at noon. Bees came by myriads, and feasted themselves on the fast-flowing fluid. Observing such a quantity of the juice falling on the ground, I put vessels beneath to receive it as it dropped from the flowers, and filled six soda-water bottles with it. After being corked and rested a few days, it was acknowledged to be an excellent cordial ; but after a while it fermented, became acid, and acquired a fetid smell.

From the 10th of October to the middle of November, the stately appearance of the plant, with its gracefully curved branches expanding like candelabra, and sustaining such a number of erect blossoms and

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buds, the flowers beautifully succeeding each other, presented to the eye a spectacle highly gratifying. The upper blossoms were in perfection so late as the 24th of December, when, a frost setting in, they were nipped ; thus terminating the beauty of a plant that will long live in the recollection of its numerous visiters, the number of which, of all ranks, amounted to 7517. It may be worthy of remark, that, as the flower-stalk grew and the flowers expanded, the leaves of the plant became flaccid and drooping, and are now rapidly withering; but the stalk is still green, and will take several months to get dry.

“During its progress towards flowering, in order to secure it from the wind and rain, I erected over it a temporary covering with pit lights, and underneath a flight of steps to a platform 12 ft. from the ground, which enabled the visiters to approach the lowermost flowers. —

T. Symons. Clowance, Feb. 1838. Plates. Vol. IV. Dele the following, as being varieties distinguished by colour,

and, therefore, not suitable for plates which, in the greater number of copies, will not be coloured :-* Magnòlia grandiflora ferruginea (2), Tilia europæ'a glauca (16), Tília europæ'a rubra (17).” Dele “Liriodendron Tulipifera obtusiloba (14), as being a variety readily understood from description.” In a few copies, the plates of T. (e) álba, the Hungarian Lime, are named T. argéntea; and T. americàna is named T. álba. A'cer obtusàtum, in a few copies, is named A. hybridum. Though botanists are well acquainted with these synonymes, we have judged it advisable to name them here, for the sake of the general reader, and to enable the binder to arrange the plates properly.

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ERRATA AND ALTERATIONS OMITTED.

ERRATA IN CONTENTS.

<6

Page xix. line 5., for “ Bilberbaum," read “Bie

berbaum." 13. for“ Varieties, 272," read “ Varieties, 278." 38. Liriodendron, for “ Bieberbaum," read

“ Tulipeerbaum." xx. L 27., for “ 295," read “ 294."

39. for “ 29," read “ 295."

16. Berberis, for “ 298," read “299." xxi. 1. 28. Mahonia, for “ Ash Berry," read

“ Ash Berberry," xxiv. 1. 31. Pittosporum, for “ 538," read

358." 6. Malvaceæ, for “362," read “360."

6. from the bottom, for “ 633," read " 363.” xxvii. l. 1., for “Lindl.," read “Juss."

13. Tilia americà na, for “ 372," read “ 373." 21., after “laxiflora,” insert “pl. 21."

43., for “ 176," read “ 376." xxix. 1. 35. Hypericum, for “362," read “ 396.”

1., for “298,” read "398." xxxiv. 1. 12. Xanthoxylum, for “pl. 6.,” read

“pl. 56." Xxxv. l. 41. Euonymus latifolius, for * fig.

661." read “ fig. 166." 15. E. echinatus, add " fig. 170."

8. from the bottom, for “ 501," read “504." Xxxvii. 1. 14. Prinos verticillatus, for “529,"

read "521." 23., for “f. 191.,' read “fig. 192." 41. Zízyphus vulgaris, for " 524," read “525."

13. Paliurus, for “ 528," read “527." Xxxviii. 1. 41., far“ 295, read 535."

44., for “555, 'read “535."
47., for “ 533," read “ 535."
16. R. Frángula, for "539," read “537."
54. Ceanothus americànus, insert "fig." before

"214."
xli. 1. 27. Spártium júnceum, for “575," read

" 576." xlii. I. 1. Genista radiata, for “519," read “ 579."

43. G. aphýlla, for “528," read "582."

Page xlv.1.43. G. diffusa, for “ 584," read "585."

41. for “fig. 336," read “ fig. 306." xlvi. I. 42. Colutea mèdia, for “ 635," read “ 636." xlviii. 1. 56. Cassièæ, for “660," read "650." lii. 1.'18. from the bottom, for “ 702,” read “709." liv. I. 28., for “ 725," read “727."

6. from bottom, forL. alba,”read“S. alba". lv. I. 3. from the bottom, for 784," read “743." Ixiii. 1. 24., for “ 605," read “ 608."

26., for “ 669," read "603 ”
Ixiv. 1. 13. from the bottom, dele “Stranvæ'sia.".
Ixviii, I. 28. from the bottom, for “923," read

928."
Ixxi.l. 14. from the bottom, for"950," read “956.
Ixxxv, I. 16. Saxifrà geæ, for " 291," read “ 994.'
Ixxxvi. 1. 10., for “ 1018," read " 1012.”
Ixxxiv. I. 21. from the bottom, for “ 1131," read

"1134."
xcix. 1. 14. from the bottom, for “125," read

“ 1256." c. l. 4., for "1364," read “1264." ci. 1. 26., after “Barbary Boxthorn," insert

" fig. 1109. 1970." 17. from the bottom, for “ 1115," read “1113." For “ Crabówskia," read “ Grabowskia." cii. 1. 3. from the bottom, for

Salsòla Sp." read “Salsola L." cxxii. 1. So., for "1509," read “ 1615." cxxiii. 1. 23. from the bottom, for “168," read cxxv. I. 12., for “ fig. 1560," read“ fig. 1569."

“ 1689."

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APPENDIX I.

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SPECIMEN OF RETURN PAPERS CIRCULATED IN 1834 AND 1835; IN

GREAT BRITAIN AND NORTH AMERICA, IN ENGLISH ; IN FRANCE AND RUSSIA, IN FRENCH ; IN ITALY, IN ITALIAN; AND IN GERMANY, DEN:

MARK, SWEDEN, ETC., IN GERMAN. One large folio sheet contained the Names of all the principal Genera, with blanks under

each proportioned to the number of Ligneous Species which each Genus contains.

ARBORETUM ET FRUTICETUM BRITANNICUM;

OR,
THE TREES AND SHRUBS THAT ENDURE THE OPEN AIR IN GREAT BRITAIN

AND IRELAND,
PICTORIALLY AND BOTANICALLY DELINEATED, AND SCIENTIFICALLY AND POPULARLY DESCRIBED.

By J. C. LOUDON, F.L.S., &c.

The nature of the Arboretum Britannicum is described in the advertisement on the last page of this sheet ; and in the Gardener's Magazine for December, 1834. The object of this Return Paper is, to procure Notices of Trees and Shrubs, whether old or young, indigenous or foreign, hardy or half-hardy, of alf the kinds mentioned below, from all parts of Great Britain, Ireland, and the Continent of Europe.

The Proprietor, Amateur, Nurseryman, Gardener, or Forester, who may receive this Paper, will greatly serve the cause of Arboriculture, if he will fill up with the names and other particulars of such species of the genera enumerated as may be on his property, within the range of his observation, or under his care. The objects are: 1. To show the different degrees of progress which trees make in different localities and climates, and in different soils and situations ; 2. To record the Arboretums, and also the smaller Collections of Trees and Shrubs that have been made in different places; and, 3. To notice Specimens remarkable for their bulk, age, beauty, singularity, or peculiarity of form; or, in the case of very young trees, for their

rapidity of growth. It is requested that this sheet, when filled up, may be returned to the undersigned, at Messrs. Longman's, 39. Paternoster Row, London, at the earliest convenience of the party to whom it is addressed.

J. C. LOUDON. London, Nov. 1834 ; May, 1835; and July, 1835.

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APPENDIX II.

LIST OF TREES AND SHRUBS INDIGENOUS TO, OR CULTIVATED IN, ITALY,

WITH THEIR SYSTEMATIC AND POPULAR ITALIAN NAMES.

Communicated by Signor Giuseppe Manetti, of the Administration of the Imperial and

Royal Gardens at Monza, in Lombardy.

Systematic Names.

Italian Narnes.
Ranunculacea.
Clématis

Clematide o Clematite.
Flammula

Clematide odorosa, Fiammola,

Flammola, Vitalba viticcio,

Vitalba piccola, Viticcio.
Vitalba

• Vitalba, Clematide, Vite bian

ca, Vitalba comune, Fior di

minue, Viorna. Vibrna

Vitalba viorna, cylindrica

Vitalba dai fiori lunghi.
Simsii

Vitalba dalle foglie cordate. flórida

Viticella dai fiori grandi,
Viticélla

Viticella, Vitalba pavonazza,

Vitalbino, Clematide azzur

ra. crispa

Clematide dai fiori cresputi. balearica

Vitalba di Maone.
Winteraceæ.
Micium

Badiana o Badiano. anisatum

Anicio stellato o stellare, Ba

diana, Finocchio della China. Magnoliàceæ. Magndlia

Magnolia. grandifdra

Magnolia, Tulipano. glauca

. Albero di castoro. conspicua

Magnolia dai fiori di giglio. Liriodendron

Liriodendro.
Tulipifera

Tulipiere, Tulipifero.
Anonàceæ.
Asimina

Asimina. triloba

Annona.
Menispermácea. .
Cócculus

. Coccolo. carolinus

Galla di Levante ?
Berberaceæ.
Bérberis

Berbero. vulgaris

Berberi, Berberi ordinario,

Berbero, Crespino, Spina acida, Spino vinetto, Spina

santa, Ossiacanta. asperma

Berbero sanza semi.
Capparidacea.
Cápparis

Cappero. spinosa

Cappero, Capparo.
Cistacea.
Cistus

Cisto. villosus

Cisto maschio. incanus

Cisti, Cisto, Cisto maschio,

Cisto rosso. créticus

- Ladano, Ladano di Barba,

Gomma Ladano. salviæfolius

Cisto femmina, Brentine, Scor

nabecco, Spazza berrette,

Muccoli. monspeliensis Brentine,

Imbrentino, Imbrentine, Muschio, Mustio, Pisciacane, Bimbrentine,

Fignamica, Fignamicone. ladaniferus

Ladano, Ladano di Porto

gallo.

Systematic Names.

Italian Names. Helianthemum

Eliantemo. vulgare

Eliantemo, Panace chironio. apenninum

Erba bottoncina.
Caryophyllacea.
Dianthus

Garofano.
Caryophyllus • Fior di gorofano, Garofano

domestico, Viola, Viola co-
mune, Viola di cinque fogbe,
Viola garofanata, Viola

scempia, Violine. Malvdceæ. Hibiscus

• Ibisco. syriacus

. Chetmia, Ketmia, Ibisco. Tiliàceæ. Tylia

Tiglia. europæ'a

Tiglia, Tilia, Tiglia femmina,

Tiglio.
Camellièæ.
Thea

Te viridis

- Tè, The, The verde. Bohea

- Tè, The, The Bu, The Bue,

The Congo, The Congo ordinario, The hylon, The nero, The puro, The polo vere da munizione, 'The

scuro. Hypericaceae. Hypericum

Iperico. calycinum • Asciro, Androse mum

Androsemo. fasciculatum Androsemo, Ciciliana.

Aceracea. Acer

Acero. spicatum

Acero di montagna. striatum

• Acero screziato. platanoides Acero riccio, Platano aquatico,

Platanaria, Pie d'oca, Platano maggiore, Platano di Nor.

vegia, Sicomoro falso. sacchárinum - Acero del Canada, Acero zuc

cheroso. Pseudo-Plátanus Acero Fico, Acero Sicomoro,

Acero tiglio, Loppo, Platano falso, Platano salvatico, Testucchio quercino, Acero

di montagna, Acero bianco. Opalus

- Acero, Loppo. campestre · Le piccole pianticelle si chig

mano Galluzzi, e faldere grande ha il nome di Loppo, Pioppo, Chioppo, Stucchio, Festucchio, Fistucchio, Al

bero da vite. opulifdlium - Acero di Spagna, Acero de

rotto. eriocárpum • Acero cotonoso, Acero bianca,

Acero spugnoso, Aæro de

Virginia, monspessulànum Acero minore, Albero latta

jolo, Acero piccolo.

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