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CHAPTER VI.

THE RESTORATION AND CONVERSION OF THE JEWS.

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It has been frequently suggested by infidels, that prophecy has a tendency to fulfil itself through the efforts of those who profess the religion from which it emanates. But when they thus assault Christianity, we find that their arguments are wholly untenable, and merely arise from heir own ignorance. No evidence is so conclusive as what

derive from accomplished prophecy, or that in a course ccomplishment. The miracles which contributed to lay foundation of Christianity are proved to have been ht, from the most authentic testimony, which is all ? can possess; and they are more or less confirmed effects produced: but that arising from prophecy le most irrefragable proof of the truth of the eligion, as it appears to our senses in a manner being controverted. We conceive that all the dictions, which are in a course of fulfilment, ription, and will be so found, if but applied to te of things with a competent understandPerhaps there are none more remarkable h respect the present condition of the resent our readers with such as relate

e are obliged occasionally to ree past and present state

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cal changes will take place ; so great, that one of the ten kingdoms secedes from all connection with the Papacy; during which seven thousand men of name or dignitycommanders of repute and fame-shall fall in the contest; those, the remnant, who are not slain, whether princes or generals, shall become so appalled at the result, that they will readily unite with the religious world, (whether feignedly or sincerely,) to praise God for the termination of this woe. After this we find that the seventh angel sounds, and that thenceforth no power can effectually impede the triumphant progress of the Redeemer's kingdom.

CHAPTER VI.

THE RESTORATION AND CONVERSION OF THE JEWS.

It has been frequently suggested by infidels, that prophecy has a tendency to fulfil itself through the efforts of those who profess the religion from which it emanates. But when they thus assault Christianity, we find that their arguments are wholly untenable, and merely arise from their own ignorance. No evidence is so conclusive as what we derive from accomplished prophecy, or that in a course of accomplishment. The miracles which contributed to lay the foundation of Christianity are proved to have been wrought, from the most authentic testimony, which is all that we can possess; and they are more or less confirmed by the effects produced: but that arising from prophecy affords the most irrefragable proof of the truth of the Christian religion, as it appears to our senses in a manner incapable of being controverted. We conceive that all the Scripture predictions, which are in a course of fulfilment, are of this description, and will be so found, if but applied to the existing state of things with a competent understanding of them. Perhaps there are none more remarkable than those which respect the present condition of the Jews: and while we present our readers with such as relate to their future prospects, we are obliged occasionally to recur to those whieh regard the past and present state of that people, because they are almost uniformly blended together.

We find, then, that these ancient people of God are to be restored as a nation, under very peculiar circumstances; and further, that a remnant will be eventually reclaimed from their unbelief and hardness of heart. Indeed it is rational to suppose, that they who through the wisdom and goodness of God, have been honoured as the primary instruments of salvation to lost mankind, should, through his wonted mercy, be finally relieved from their manifold privations and sufferings, and become triumphant and happy in the land of their fathers, from whence they have been so long expelled.

In the course of this chapter the frequent recital from Scripture of extraordinary acts of Divine intervention which will be displayed in favour of the Israelites, however wonderful, may appear tedious or uninteresting to some of our readers; yet we feel constrained to present them. They have been greatly neglected, and their true purport but little regarded. Their design and importance has, as it were, been closed to the generality of both hearers and readers. We must further observe, that the prophecies relative to the Jews cannot be given in regular succession, as with historical precision. Not only their obscurity, in some instances, but the spirit of the sacred Oracles, preclude the possibility of such an arrangement. Partial repetitions, mingled with additional predictions, almost constantly recur; so that any attempt to condense these important prophecies to a complete order of succession, in point of time, would be not only to misrepresent the sense, but to injure their beauty, and would prove alike unsatisfactory and incomplete.

Their restoration will be achieved during the general prevalence of trial and affliction. The prophet Daniel, after foretelling the extinction of the Turkish empire, immediately predicts the unexampled trouble which shall take place at that time, (Dan. XII. 1;) but adds that “Michael shall stand up, the great Prince who standeth for the children of God's people;" i. e., Christ. We cannot from thence, however, presume to determine what length of time may intervene before the completion of this important event; and can only conjecture, that when the troubles which lead to the fall of the mystical Babylon shall have extensively commenced, the Jews will be unavoidably involved in them. It is from the midst of these that they will seek deliverance and national restoration, endeavouring to effect a return to the land of their forefathers, and deriving aid from those nations who will favour their project, doubtless from various political motives, and, perhaps, in some degree from the influence of prophecy. But as there is no ground for supposing that this will take place before the fall of the Mystical Babylon, we conclude that both revolutions, Mahommedan and Papal, will be necessary to facilitate it. We may also imagine, that the nations which have united in hostility to Papal domination, will particularly assist in effecting this great design. The power and influence of those kingdoms must be greatly extended by the victories gained over both civil and ecclesiastical despotism in the more southern regions of Europe, and Mahommedan fanaticism in the east; and whatever changes may ensue in their territorial acquisitions, the way must be prepared, and many obstructions removed, for the return of the Jews to Palestine.

The rapid extension of Christian knowledge which will

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