Memoirs of the Life of Mrs. Sumbel, Late Wells: Of the Theatres-Royal, Drury-Lane, Covent-Garden, and Haymarket ...

Front Cover
C. Chapple, 1811 - Actors
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 226 - ... the bed, he conceived his Lordship had got into it, and rose to see; but he did not find him there. He next examined the night-bolt on the door, and found it fast ; and he saw by the candle he had not been long in bed, or he might otherwise have conceived it a dream. He rung his bell, and inquired of his servants where Lord Lyttleton was ? they said they had not seen him. The night-gown was next sought for, and found in its usual place. Mr. Andrews knew not of his Lordship's death till next day,...
Page 184 - Foxes have holes, and birds of the air have nests ; but the Son of Man hath not where to lay His head.' I will be despised, will you bear the despite with Me? I will be lonely, will you have companionship with a lonely man ? " It is like our old story from the Old Testament of Naomi and Euth.
Page 224 - Upon which he went up to bed, and his valet brought him up some trifling medicine to take, but had forgotten a spoon to stir it ; he sent him down for one ; and on his return, found him actually a corpse on the bed ! he looked at his Lordship's fine stop-watch, and found the hands exactly at the stroke of twelve o'clock. Mr. Andrews finding...
Page 95 - WHEN a man hath taken a wife, and married her, and it come to pass that she find no favour in his eyes, because he hath found some uncleanness in her : then let him write her a bill of divorcement, and give it in her hand, and send her out of his house.
Page 210 - I hope you will have the goodness to give orders to your people to speak favourably of the Charles, as more depends on that than you can possibly be aware of.
Page 227 - Lordship's death till next day, when letters from London announced it to have taken place exactly at twelve o'clock the night before. As must naturally be supposed, the circumstance and the loss of his friend made a very great impression upon Mr. Andrews, and affected him for some months after, as he is positive to his being awake at the time it happened, and of the appearance of the phantom. Upon taking an impartial view of the business : — The circumstances connected with Lord Lyttleton's death...
Page 225 - ... drawn open, and he saw his Lordship standing before him, in a large figured morning-gown which always remained in the house for his Lordship's sole use. Mr. Andrews conceiving that his Lordship had arrived after he had retired, as he so positively expected him on that day, said to him, " My Lord you are at some of your tricks ; go to your bed or I will throw something at you." — The answer he returned was — " It is all over -with me, Andrews .'"—and instantly disappeared. As there was a...
Page 225 - Lordship did not come down on the day he promised, which was the very one on which he died, could not imagine the reason of it, and had retired to rest somewhat before twelve. He had not been long lying down when the curtains at the foot of the bed were drawn open, and he saw his Lordship standing before him, in a large figured morning-gown which always remained in the house for his Lordship's sole use. Mr. Andrews conceiving that his Lordship had arrived after he had retired, as he so positively...
Page 224 - Andrews finding that his Lordship did not come down on the day he promised, which was the very one on which he died, could not imagine the reason of it, and had retired to rest somewhat before twelve. He had not been long lying down when the curtains at the foot of the bed were drawn open, and he saw his Lordship...
Page 223 - ... alarmed at the circumstance, it made a deep impression upon him, and he determined to put off a visit he was to have paid Mr. Andrews that very week ; and the night which the spectre prescribed as his last, was the very one he was expected to sleep at Dartford. On the fatal evening his lordship had several of his friends about him, who amused themselves with looking at the family pictures till the hour of twelve o'clock arrived. As some of them regarded it a phantom of his lordship's brain, 224...

Bibliographic information