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Books Books 1 - 10 of 16 on The effect once produced by an impression on the brain, whether in perception or....
" The effect once produced by an impression on the brain, whether in perception or intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the part, be it what it may, which has been thereby changed, is exactly represented in the part which, in the course... "
A Manual of Physiology and of the Principles of Disease - Page 246
by Edward Dillon Mapother - 1864 - 567 pages
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Lectures on surgical pathology, Volume 1

Sir James Paget - Pathology, Surgical - 1853
...and knowledge of sensuous things as the sudden destruction by some great injury is? The answer k— because of the exactness of assimilation accomplished...formative process : the effect once produced by an impi'ession upon the brain, whether in perception or in intellect ual act, is fixed and there retained...
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The Asylum Journal of Mental Science

Psychology - 1857
...things, as the sudden destruction by some great injury is? The answer is, because of the exactuess of assimilation accomplished in the formative process. The effect once produced by an impression on the brain, whether in perception or intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the...
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On Obscure Diseases of the Brain, and Disorders of the Mind: Their Incipient ...

Forbes Winslow - Brain - 1860 - 576 pages
...of all memory and knowledge of sensuous things as the sudden destruction by sonic great injury is ? The answer is, — because of the exactness of assimilation...and there retained; because the part, be it what it niay, which has been thereby changed, is exactly represented in the part which, in the course of nutrition,...
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Obscure Diseases of the Brain and Mind

Forbes Winslow - Brain - 1866 - 483 pages
...destructive of all memory and knowledge of sensuous things as the sudden destruction by some great injury is? The answer is, — because of the exactness of assimilation...the effect once produced by an impression upon the brainr whether in perception or in intellectual act, is fixed and there retained; because the part.be...
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The Art of Scientific Discovery: Or, The General Conditions and Methods of ...

George Gore - Science - 1878 - 648 pages
...all memory and all knowledge of sensuous things as their sudden destruction by some great injury is? the answer is, because of the exactness of assimilation...impression upon the brain, whether in perception or intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the part, be it what it may, which has been...
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The Art of Scientific Discovery: Or, The General Conditions and Methods of ...

George Gore - Chimie, Découvertes - 1878 - 648 pages
...all memory and all knowledge of sensuous things as their sudden destruction by some great injury is ? the answer is, because of the exactness of assimilation...impression upon the brain, whether in perception or intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the part, be it what it may, which has been...
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A manual of psychological medicine, by J.C. Bucknill and D.H. Tuke

Sir John Charles Bucknill - 1879 - 815 pages
...of all memory and knowledge of sensuous things, as the sudden destruction by some great injury is ? The answer is, because of the exactness of assimilation...process. The effect once produced by an impression on the brain, whether in perception or intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the...
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A manual of psychological medicine, by J.C. Bucknill and D.H. Tuke

Sir John Charles Bucknill - 1879 - 815 pages
...of all memory and knowledge of sensuous things, as the sudden destruction by some great injury is ? The answer is, because of the exactness of assimilation...process. The effect once produced by an impression on the brain, whether in perception or intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the...
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Diseases of Memory: An Essay in the Positive Psychology

Théodule Ribot - Amnesia - 1882 - 209 pages
...destructive of all memory and knowledge of sensuous things as the sudden destruction by some great injury is? The answer is, because of the exactness of assimilation...which, in the course of nutrition, succeeds to it." * Paradoxical as it may appear, the connection between contagious diseases and the memory is, from...
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The American Journal of Psychology, Volume 10

Karl M. Dallenbach, Madison Bentley, Edwin Garrigues Boring, Margaret Floy Washburn - Psychology - 1899
...function again when properly stimulated. Conservation of impressions is a state of the cerebral organism.' The effect once produced by an impression upon the brain, whether in perception or in a higher intellectual act, i: and there retained. The retention of any act in memcrv .•, • cording...
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