A Manual of Physiology and of the Principles of Disease

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Fannin, 1864 - Pathology - 567 pages
 

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Page 401 - There is grandeur in this view of life, with its several powers, having been originally breathed into a few forms or into one; and that, whilst this planet has gone cycling on' according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.
Page 400 - I believe that animals have descended from at most only. four or five progenitors, and plants from an equal or lesser number. " Analogy would lead me one step further, namely, to the belief that all animals and plants have descended from some one prototype.
Page 401 - Therefore I should infer from analogy that probably all the organic beings which have ever lived on this earth, have descended from some one primordial form, into which life was first breathed.
Page 246 - The effect once produced by an impression on the brain, whether in perception or intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the part, be it what it may, which has been thereby changed, is exactly represented in the part which, in the course of nutrition, succeeds to it.
Page 401 - Nevertheless all living things have much in common, in their chemical composition, their cellular structure, their laws of growth, and their liability to injurious influences.
Page 246 - ... intellectual act, is fixed and there retained ; because the part, be it what it may, which has been thereby changed, is exactly represented in the part which, in the course of nutrition succeeds to it. Thus, in the recollection of sensuous things, the Mind refers to a brain, in which are retained the effects, or, rather, the likenesses, of changes that past impressions and intellectual acts had made. As in some way passing far our knowledge, the Mind perceived, and took...
Page 400 - Analogy would lead me one step further, namely , to the belief that all animals and plants have descended from some one prototype. But analogy may be a deceitful guide. Nevertheless all living things have much in common, in their chemical composition, their germinal vesicles, their cellular structure, and their laws of growth and reproduction.
Page 294 - Suppose a worm, in the bowels, irritating their centripetal nerve-fibres: the irritation is propagated to the spinal cord, which reflects it upon the roots of the cervical sympathetic nerve, by which it reaches the bloodvessels of the retina, produces their contraction, and, as a consequence of this cause of diminution in the amount of blood, an amaurosis. If instead of the reflex action on the bloodvessels there is an action on the tissues, as in the case of the experiments of Czermak and Prof.
Page 451 - That during the progress of these changes the cells of the cartilage become enlarged, rounded, and filled with corpuscles, in lieu of healthy cells ; bursting subsequently, and discharging their contents into the texture on the surface ; whilst the hyaline substance splits into bands and fibres, the changed hyaline substance and the discharged corpuscles of the cells, afterwards forming, in many cases, a fibro-nucleated membrane on the surface of the diseased cartilage.
Page 35 - Cuba, or anywhere in his natural state, is quite as likely to squat on his hams as to stand on his feet. Thus, an anatomist with the negro and ourang-outang before him, after a careful comparison, would say, perhaps, that nature herself had been puzzled where to place them, and had finally compromised the matter by giving them an exactly equal inclination to the form and attitude of each other.

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