The Works of the English Poets: With Prefaces, Biographical and Critical, Volume 18

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Samuel Johnson
C. Bathurst, 1779 - English poetry
 

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Page 263 - And give him to his aged father's sight. Now let him perish, since you hold it good, And glut the Trojans with his pious blood. Yet from our lineage he derives his name, And, in the fourth degree, from god Pilumnus came; Yet he devoutly pays you rites divine, And offers daily incense at your shrine.
Page 100 - Observant of the souls that pass the downward way. From hence are heard the groans of ghosts, the pains Of sounding lashes and of dragging chains. The Trojan stood...
Page 87 - Just in the gate and in the jaws of hell, Revengeful Cares and sullen Sorrows dwell, And pale Diseases, and repining Age, Want, Fear, and Famine's unresisted rage; Here Toils, and Death, and Death's half-brother, Sleep, Forms terrible to view, their sentry keep; With anxious Pleasures of a guilty mind, Deep Frauds before, and open Force behind; The Furies' iron beds; and Strife, that shakes Her hissing tresses and unfolds her snakes.
Page 121 - His mother ; fair Marica was her name. But Faunus came from Picus : Picus drew His birth from Saturn, if records be true. Thus king Latinus, in the third degree, Had Saturn author of his family.
Page 30 - Th' offended lover and the pow'rful queen? This way, and that, he turns his anxious mind, And all expedients tries, and none can find. Fix'd on the deed, but doubtful of the means — After long thought, to this advice he leans: Three chiefs he calls, commands them to repair The fleet, and ship their men, with silent care.
Page 120 - The Trojan, from the main, beheld a wood, Which thick with shades, and a brown horror, stood : Betwixt the trees the Tiber took his course, With whirlpools dimpled ; and, with downward force, That drove the sand along, he took his way, And roll'd his yellow billows to the sea. About him, and above, and round the wood, The birds that haunt the borders of his flood, That bath'd within, or bask'd upon his side, To tuneful songs their narrow throats apply'd. The captain gives command : the joyful train...
Page 111 - High as the Mother of the Gods in place, And proud, like her, of an immortal race. Then, when in pomp she makes the Phrygian round, With golden turrets on her temples crown'd; A hundred gods her sweeping train supply; Her offspring all, and all command the sky.
Page 61 - If great ^Eneas and Acestes join In his request, these gauntlets I resign; Let us with equal arms perform the fight, And let him leave to fear, since I resign my right.
Page 86 - O'er whose unhappy waters, void of light, No bird presumes to steer his airy flight : Such deadly stenches from the depth arise, And steaming sulphur, that infects the skies. From hence, the Grecian bards their legends make, And give the name Avernus, to the lake.
Page 223 - Th' inverted lance makes furrows in the plain. E'en time, that changes all, yet changes us in vain — The body, not the mind — nor can control Th' immortal vigor, or abate the soul.

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