The Essays of Michel de Montaigne, Volume 3

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G. Bell & Sons, Limited, 1908
 

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Page 98 - Nam tu sola potes tranquilla pace iuvare mortalis, quoniam belli fera moenera Mavors armipotens regit, in gremium qui saepe tuum se reicit aeterno devictus vulnere amoris, atque ita suspiciens tereti cervice reposta pascit amore avidos inhians in te, dea, visus, eque tuo pendet resupini spiritus ore.
Page 232 - Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him become a fool, that he may be wise. 19 For the wisdom of this world is foolishness with God. For it is written, He taketh the wise in their own craftiness. 20 And again. The Lord knoweth the thoughts of the wise, that they are vain.
Page 94 - Audio, quid veteres olim moneatis amici: Pone seram, cohibe: sed quis custodiet ipsos Custodes ? cauta est et ab illis incipit uxor.
Page 70 - Tithonia flectere coniunx. aspice qui coeant populi, quae moenia clausis 385 ferrum acuant portis in me excidiumque meorum.' dixerat et niveis hinc atque hinc diva lacertis cunctantem amplexu molli fovet. ille repente accepit solitam flammam, notusque medullas intravit calor et labefacta per ossa cucurrit, 390 non secus atque olim tonitru cum rupta corusco ignea rima micans percurrit lumine nimbos.
Page 157 - ... love in biting and scratching. It is not vigorous and generous enough if it be not quarrelsome ; if civilized and artificial, if it treads nicely, and fears the shock.
Page 20 - I speak truth, not so much as I would, but as much as I dare: and I dare a little the more, as I grow older; for methinks custom allows to age more liberty of prating, and more indiscretion of talking of a man's self.
Page 264 - I am betimes sensible of the little breezes that begin to sing and whistle in the shrouds, the fore-runners of the storm : 1 Buchanan.
Page 215 - ... tis ridiculous and unjust that the laziness of our wives should be maintained with our sweat and labour. No man, so far as in me lies, shall have a clearer, a more quiet and free fruition of his estate than I. If the husband bring matter, nature herself will that the wife find the form. As to the duties of conjugal friendship, that some think to be impaired by these absences, I am quite of another opinion. It is, on the contrary, an intelligence that easily cools by a too frequent and assiduous...
Page 74 - might I have had my own will, I would not have married Wisdom herself, if she would have had me: but 'tis to much purpose to evade it, the common custom and use of life will have it so. Most of my actions are guided by example, not choice.
Page 138 - ... tis short both in extent of time and extent of matter: Vixere fortes ante Agamemnona Multi, sed omnes illacrymabiles Urgentur, ignotique longa Nocte.

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