Gleanings through Wales, Holland, and Westphalia. To which is added, Humanity; a poem, Volume 1

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Page 87 - The learn'd is happy nature to explore, The fool is happy that he knows no more ; The rich is happy in the plenty given, The poor contents him with the care of Heaven.
Page 290 - All the performances of human art, at which we look with praise or wonder, are instances of the resistless force of perseverance; it is by this that the quarry becomes a pyramid, and that distant countries are united with canals.
Page 345 - The poor contents him with the care of Heav'n. See the blind beggar dance, the cripple sing, The sot a hero, lunatic a king; The starving chemist in his golden views Supremely blest, the poet in his muse.
Page 347 - But mutual wants this happiness increase ; All Nature's difference keeps all Nature's peace. Condition, circumstance, is not the thing; Bliss is the same in subject or in king. In who obtain defence, or who defend, In him who is, or him who finds a friend ; 48 Heaven breathes through every member of the whole One common blessing, as one common soul.
Page 167 - Above the castle is a long ridge of hills finely shaded, part of which is the park ; and still higher is a terrace, up to which you are led through very fine lawns, from whence you have a view that exceeds...
Page 194 - London. The weather was so very terrific, that I had forgot his inveterate exactness, and had yielded up the hope of expecting him. Twelve at noon was the hour ; and exactly as the clock struck...
Page 193 - ... that time. His journeys were continued from prison to prison, from one group of wretched beings to another, night and day ; and where he could not go with a carriage he would ride, and where that was hazardous he would walk. Such a thing as an obstruction was out of the question.
Page 159 - Length of life is distributed impartially to very different modes of life in very different climates ; and the mountains have no greater examples of age and health than the...
Page 98 - ... it being, at least, as usual for the Pastoras of the mountains to go from the bed of courtship to the bed of marriage as unpolluted and maidenly as the Chloes of fashion; and yet you are not to conclude that this proceeds from their being less susceptible of the belle-passion than their betters; or that the cold air which they breathe has 'froze the genial current of their souls.
Page 347 - Heaven to Mankind impartial we confefs, If all are equal in their Happinefs : But mutual wants this Happinefs increafe; 55 All Nature's difference keeps all Nature's peace.

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