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" Could the England of 1685 be, by some magical process, set before our eyes, we should not know one landscape in a hundred or one building in ten thousand. "
The Sonning parish magazine
1869
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The Living Age ..., Volume 20

1849
...Our concluding extracts shall be taken from this chapter. ENGLAND IN 1633. Could the England of 1085 be by some magical process set before our eyes, we...building in ten thousand. The country gentleman would not recognize his own fields. The inhabitant of the town would not recognize his own street. Everything...
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The History of England: From the Accession of James the Second, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay - Great Britain - 1849
...which the history of the old world furnishes no parallel has land si.™ taken place in our country. Could the England of 1685 be, by some magical process, set before our eyes, we should not know CHAP. one landscape in a hundred or one building in ten thousand. The country gentleman would not recognise...
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Friends' Review: A Religious, Literary and Miscellaneous Journal, Volume 2

1849
...of the Old World furnishes no parallel, has laken place in our country. Could the England of 1 685 be, by some magical process, set before our eyes, we should not know one landscape in a hundred, pr one building in ten thousand. The country gentleman would not recognize his own fields. The inhabitant...
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The Edinburgh Christian magazine, Volumes 1-2

1850
...— to which the history of the old world furnishes no parallel — has taken place in our country. Could the England of 1685, be, by some magical process,...before our eyes, we should not know one landscape in one hundred, or one building in ten thousand." — ilncaulay's History ч/' l, Vol. i., p. 280. TRAINING...
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THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND FROM THE ACCESSION OF JAMES II.

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Great Britain - 1850 - 617 pages
...change to which the history of the old world furnishes no parallel has taken place in our country. Could the England of 1685 be, by some magical process, set before our eyes, w« should not know one landscape in a hundred or one building in ten thousand. The country gentleman...
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The History of England from the Accession of James II.

Thomas Babington Macaulay Baron Macaulay - Great Britain - 1852
...change to which the history of the old world furnishes no parallel has taken place in our country. Could the England of 1685 be, by some magical process, set before our eyes, wa should not know one landscape in a hundred or one building in ten thousand. The country gentleman...
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Prize Essays on Juvenile Delinquency

House of Refuge (Philadelphia, Pa.) - Juvenile delinquency - 1855 - 159 pages
...century. The poorest artizan now enjoys luxuries, which a queen could not then command. Macaulay says : " Could the England of 1685 be, by some magical process,...landscape in a hundred, or one building in ten thousand. Many thousands of square miles which are now rich corn land and meadow, intersected by green hedge...
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Journal of the Architectural, Archæological, and Historic Society ..., Volume 1

Cheshire (England) - 1857
...the 12th and 15th. Mr. Macaulay is ouly going so far back as the 17th century when he says, that " Could the England of 1685 be, by some magical process,...town would not recognise his own street. Everything hus been changed, but the great features of Nature, and a few massive and * Simon de Albo Monasterio,...
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The History of England from the Accession of James the Second, Volume 1

Thomas Babington Macaulay - Great Britain - 1858 - 455 pages
...of the old world furnishes no parallel Kns'udrince has taken place in our country. Could •; 1M5' the England of 1685 be, by some magical process, set...street. Everything has been changed, but the great features~oFnature, and a few massive and durable works of human art We might find out Snowdon and Windermere,...
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The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal

Science - 1861
...of England at the time when the sceptre passed away from Charles the Second to the tyrant James. " Could the England of 1685 be by some magical process...landscape in a hundred, or one building in ten thousand. Everything has been changed but the great features of nature, and a few massive and durable works of...
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