Time, Work, and Culture in the Middle Ages

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University of Chicago Press, Feb 15, 1982 - History - 384 pages
Jacques Le Goff is a prominent figure in the tradition of French medieval scholarship, profoundly influenced by the Annales school, notably, Bloch, Febvre, and Braudel, and by the ethnographers and anthropologists Mauss, Dumézil, and Lévi-Strauss. In building his argument for "another Middle Ages" (un autre moyen âge), Le Goff documents the emergence of the collective mentalité from many sources with scholarship both imaginative and exact.


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Contents

The Several Middle Ages of Jules Michelet
3
Merchants Time and Churchs Time in the Middle Ages
29
A Note on Tripartite Society Monarchical Ideology
53
Labor Techniques and Craftsmen in the Value Systems
71
Peasants and the Rural World in the Literature of
87
Academic Expenses at Padua in the Fifteenth Century
101
Trades and Professions as Represented in Medieval
107
the Medieval University Conceive of Itself
122
The Universities and the Public Authorities in
135
Clerical Culture and Folklore Traditions in Merovingian
153
Dreams in the Culture and Collective Psychology of
201
The Historian and the Ordinary Man
225
The Symbolic Ritual of Vassalage
237
Notes Bibliographies and Appendixes
289
Index
368
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About the author (1982)

Jacques Le Goff (1927-2014) was a prominent French historian and medievalist. He was a key proponent of the Annales school of historical analysis, which emphasizes longterm social history over political or military themes. He argued that the Middle Ages were a distinct form of civilization, substantively different from both the classsical and modern worlds.

Arthur Goldhammer is the translator for numerous books including Neoconservatism: The Biography of a Movement, Algerian Chronicles, The Society of Equals, and Capital in the Twenty-First Century. He received the French-American Translation Prize in 1990 for his translation of A Critical Dictionary of the French Revolution.

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