The popular educator, Volume 4

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Page 173 - It is true, that a little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion ;* for while the mind of man looketh upon second causes scattered...
Page 366 - If I have seen any perish for want of clothing, or any poor without covering; If his loins have not blessed me, and if he were not warmed with the fleece of my sheep; If I have lifted up my hand against the fatherless, when I saw my help in the gate: Then let mine arm fall from my shoulder blade, and mine arm be broken from the bone.
Page 367 - Sometimes a distant sail gliding along the edge of the ocean would be another theme of idle speculation. How interesting this fragment of a world hastening to rejoin the great mass of existence! What a glorious monument of human invention, that has thus triumphed over wind and wave ; has brought the ends of the earth in communion ; has established an interchange of blessings, pouring...
Page 367 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Page 84 - ... they were stoned, they were sawn asunder, were tempted, were slain with the sword: they wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins; being destitute, afflicted, tormented; (of whom the world was not worthy) they wandered in deserts, and in mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth.
Page 174 - ... truth. He has dissipated the prejudice that had long connected gaiety with vice, and easiness of manners with laxity of principles. He has restored virtue to its dignity, and taught innocence not to be ashamed. This is an elevation of literary character "above all Greek, above all Roman fame.
Page 130 - IN the tempest of life, when the wave and the gale Are around and above, if thy footing should fail — If thine eye should grow dim and thy caution depart — "Look aloft" and be firm, and be fearless of heart.
Page 368 - Nature confessed some atonement to be necessary : the gospel discovers that the necessary atonement is made." 2. When several semicolons have preceded, and a still greater pause is necessary, in order to mark the connecting or concluding sentiment: as, " A divine legislator, uttering his voice from heaven ; an almighty governor, stretching forth his arm to punish or reward ; informing us of perpetual rest prepared hereafter for the righteous, and of indignation and wrath awaiting the wicked : these...
Page 367 - New-born, I bless the waking hour ; Once more, with awe, rejoice to be; My conscious soul resumes her power, And springs, my guardian God, to thee.

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