The Vintner's Guide

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J. Bromell, 1825 - Liquor industry - 228 pages
 

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Page 95 - The reason is said to be that chattels are in the custody of the law for the debt which arises from the thing itself, and not for any other debt due from the same party, for the law is open to all such debts and doth not admit private persons to make reprisal.
Page 81 - Quakers) affirmation of one or more credible witness or witnesses before one or more justice or justices of the peace of the county, riding, division, city...
Page 212 - House, who shall sell any Beer, Cider, or Perry by Retail to be drank or consumed in or upon the House or Premises where sold, without having an Excise Retail Licence in force authorizing him so to do...
Page 210 - That if any person or persons shall make, or manufacture, deal in, retail, or sell any goods or commodities hereinafter mentioned, or shall exercise or carry on any trade or business hereinafter mentioned, for the making or manufacturing, or dealing in, retailing, or selling of which...
Page 165 - King George the Fourth, intituled ' An Act to repeal several Duties payable on Excise Licences in Great Britain and Ireland, and to impose other Duties in lieu thereof, and to amend the Laws for granting Excise Licences...
Page 85 - ... as well for and against the using of unlawful games as also for the using and maintenance of good order and rule to be had and used within the same, as by their discretion shall be thought necessary and convenient.
Page 209 - ... renew the same as often as necessity shall require, for the purpose of keeping the same in good order and condition during the continuance of his, her, or their licence, he, she, or they shall forfeit for every such offence the sum of twenty pounds...
Page 211 - ... measure, or in not less than two dozen reputed quart bottles at one time, to be drunk or consumed elsewhere than on his, her, or their premises...
Page 96 - Exeter, if a man commit a horse to an hostler, and he eat out the price of his head, the hostler may take him as his own, upon the reasonable appraisement of four of his neighbours ; which was, it seems, a custom arising from the abundance of traffic with strangers, that could not be known, to charge them with the action, (a) But the innkeeper hath no power to sell the horse, by the general custom of (he whole kingdom.
Page 93 - ... labourers and workmen, which for the following of their work by the day or by the great, in any City, town corporate, market town or village, shall, for the time of their...

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