St. Nicholas, Volume 47

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Page 52 - Depend upon it, you would gain unspeakably if you would learn with me to see some of the poetry and the pathos, the tragedy and the comedy, lying in the experience of a human soul that Looks out through dull grey eyes, and that speaks in a voice of quite ordinary tones.
Page 54 - In old days there were angels who came and took men by the hand and led them away from the city of destruction. We see no white-winged angels now. -But yet men are led away from threatening destruction: a hand is put into theirs, which leads them forth gently towards a calm and bright land, so that they look no more backward; and the hand may be a little child's.
Page 395 - Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations: ask thy father, and he will show thee; thy elders, and they will tell >thee.
Page 260 - They shall be gentle, brave and strong, To spill no drop of blood, but dare All that may plant man's lordship firm On earth and fire, and sea, and air. Nation with nation, land with land, Unarmed shall live as comrades free; In every heart and brain shall throb The pulse of one fraternity.
Page 54 - The heap of gold seemed to glow and get larger beneath his agitated gaze. He leaned forward at last, and stretched forth his hand; but instead of...
Page 50 - We could never have loved the earth so well if we had had no childhood in it — if it were not the earth where the same flowers come up again every spring that we used to gather with our tiny fingers as we sat lisping to ourselves on the grass — the same hips and haws on the autumn hedgerows — the same redbreasts that we used to call " God's birds," because they did no harm to the precious crops.
Page 468 - Now, therefore, we, the elected Representatives of the ancient Irish people in National Parliament assembled, do, in the name of the Irish Nation, ratify the establishment of the Irish Republic and pledge ourselves and our people to make this declaration effective by every means at our command...
Page 50 - When our two lives grew like two buds that kiss At lightest thrill from the bee's swinging chime, Because the one so near the other is. He was the elder and a little man Of forty inches, bound to show no dread, And I the girl that puppy-like now ran, Now lagged behind my brother's larger tread. I held him wise, and when he talked to me Of snakes and birds, and which God loved the best, I thought his knowledge marked the boundary Where men grew blind, though angels knew the rest. If he said " Hush...
Page 260 - Twas, in itself, a joy to see ; — While Fancy whispered in my ear, " That torch they pass is Liberty ! " And, each, as she received the flame, Lighted her altar with its ray ; Then, smiling, to the next who came, Speeded it on its sparkling way. From Albion first, whose ancient shrine Was...
Page 568 - The murmuring of many voices, the upturning of many faces, the pressing on of many footsteps in the outskirts of the crowd, so that it swells forward in a mass, like one great heave of water, all flashes away.

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