A select collection of epitaphs and monumental inscriptions, with anecdotes of distinguished and estraordinary persons

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J. Raw, 1806 - Epitaphs - 230 pages

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Page 146 - No farther seek his merits to disclose, Or draw his frailties from their dread abode, (There they alike in trembling hope repose,) The bosom of his Father and his God.
Page 186 - Statesman \ yet friend to Truth! of soul sincere, ' In action faithful, and in honour clear ; 'Who broke no promise, serv'd no private end, 'Who gain'd no title, and who lost no friend ; 'Ennobled by himself, by all approv'd, 'And prais'd, unenvy'd, by the Muse he lov'd.
Page 74 - Though secure of our hearts, yet confoundedly sick If they were not his own by finessing and trick : He cast off his friends, as a huntsman his pack, For he knew when he pleas'd he could whistle them back.
Page 74 - Till his relish grown callous, almost to disease, Who pepper'd the highest, was surest to please. But let us be candid, and speak out our mind, If dunces applauded, he paid them in kind.
Page 220 - JLjO ! where this silent Marble weeps, A Friend, a Wife, a Mother sleeps : A Heart, within whose sacred cell The peaceful Virtues lov'd to dwell. Affection warm, and faith sincere, • And soft humanity were there.
Page 187 - Here rests a woman, good without pretence, Blest with plain reason, and with sober sense ; No conquest she, but o'er herself desir'd ; No arts essay'd, but not to be admir'd.
Page 181 - To this sad shrine, whoe'er thou art, draw near, Here lies the friend most loved, the son most dear; Who ne'er knew joy, but friendship might divide, Or gave his father grief but when he died.
Page 177 - Three poets in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn; The first in loftiness of thought surpassed, The next in majesty; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go, To make a third she joined the former two.
Page 208 - Parcae thought him one, He played so truly. So by error to his fate They all consented; But viewing him since (alas, too late) They have repented. And have sought (to give new birth) In baths to steep him; But, being so much too good for earth, Heaven vows to keep him.
Page 73 - As an actor, confest without rival to shine ; As a wit, if not first, in the very first line : Yet, with talents like these, and an excellent heart, The man had his failings, a dupe to his art ; Like an ill-judging beauty, his colours he spread, And beplaster'd with rouge his own natural red. On the stage he was natural, simple, affecting ; 'Twas only that when he was off, he was acting.

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