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Court may apply such portion of the Prize as they may see fit in recognition of merits thus brought to their notice.

The Court of the Grocers' Company intends to act through a standing Scientific Committee, or with the advice of such a Committee, and the following gentlemen have kindly consented to form the first Scientific Committee, viz.: Mr. John Simon, C.B., F.R.S.; Professor Tyndall, F.R.S.; Dr. J. Burdon Sanderson, F.R.S.; and Dr. George Buchanan, F.R.S.

3.-PRIZES.

Besides the Class Prizes, and a number of Prizes given by the different Professors for particular kinds of merit, there are others which the generosity of public-spirited individuals has founded for the encouragement of learning in the University.

The names of the Prizemen for Session 1882-83 will be found in the Degree and Prize List.

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ARNOTT PRIZES.-Founded in 1869, by Dr. Neil Arnott, of London, who presented to the Senate the sum of £1,000 to found a Prize, or Prizes, for the encouragement of the study of Natural Philosophy among the medical students of the University.

By resolution of the Senate, of date April 10, 1873, the following regulations were adopted :

1. That there shall be two separate examinations-one in General Physics, for students of the first and second years of their Medical studies; the other for students of the third and fourth years, in Physiological Physics, or the application of the doctrines of General Physics to Physiological Science.

2. The knowledge required for the second of these examinations being much more extensive, and of a much higher order than that required for the first, and being the kind of knowledge of which it is most important to encourage the cultivation, as not only useful in the practice of the Medical Art, but eminently fitted to advance the Physiological Sciences; that a sum of not less than Twenty-five pounds be offered annually, in one or several sums, as circumstances may require, to the student or students who excel in the second examination.

3. That the remaining portion of the revenue derived annually from Dr. Arnott's donation be offered in the same way to the student or students who excel in the first examination.

4. That the first examination be under the superintendence of the Faculty of Arts, with the Professors of Physiology and of Anatomy as Assessors.

5. That the second examination shall be under the superintendence of the Medical Faculty, with the Professors of Natural Philosophy and of Mathematics as Assessors.

6. That all candidates shall, at the commencement of each session, intimate their intention to the Assistant-Clerk of Senate; and that, to prevent unqualified persons from coming forward, each candidate shall produce satisfactory evidence of his having attended a Course of Lectures on Natural Philosophy, or of having been a pupil in a Laboratory where Practical Physics or Practical Physiology is taught; or, failing of these qualifications, he shall deposit the sum of ten shillings, which shall be forfeited if his examination marks fall below the average standard.

7. That every candidate who passes creditably the first examination shall be thereby entitled to come forward for the second, without being obliged to deposit the sum of ten shillings.

8. That no prize shall be awarded without sufficient merit being shown, and that in the event of one or more of the prizes on any occasion not being awarded, the amount shall be added to the principal sum.

The examination will be in writing, and will be held on Saturday, the 10th November, 1883, in the Examination Hall, at Three P.M. Intending candidates to give in their names to the Assistant-Clerk of Senate on or before the 10th October.

BRUNTON MEMORIAL PRIZE.-Founded in 1879, in memory of the late Duncan M. Brunton, M.A., M.B., Paisley, a distinguished graduate of this University, who died in 1877 of fever contracted in the diligent discharge of his professional duties in the Royal Infirmary of Paisley. The Committee of Subscribers paid over to the Senate the sum of £300, the interest of which is to be given annually to the most distinguished graduate in Medicine of the year.

BUCHANAN PRIZES.-The annual proceeds of the Buchanan Bursary Fund (see p. 142) are now, with the sanction of the subscribers, applied

to the purchase of Books, which are annually awarded to the most distinguished students in the classes of Logic, Moral Philosophy, and English Literature.

CLELAND GOLD MEDAL.-Dr. James Cleland, Superintendent of Public Works in Glasgow, who died 14th October, 1840, founded a Gold Medal of the value of Ten Guineas, to be bestowed in alternate years on a student of Divinity and a student of Natural Philosophy, as a Prize for the best Essay on any subject to be prescribed by the Principal and Professors of the University.

COULTER PRIZES.—In 1787, Mr. James Coulter, merchant in Glasgow, beqeathed £200 to the University, “the annual proceeds to be applied in premiums, one or more, either pecuniary or honorary, for the encouragement of Composition and Elocution, upon subjects of the Faculty's choosing." The interest of this sum is now divided into Two Prizes, the one of £5, and the other of £2, 10s.; the former to be given in alternate years for a Sermon or Theological Essay, and for an Essay in Mental Philosophy and English Literature, the latter to be given annually for a Translation from some Classical Author, or other Composition connected with Classical Literature. The competition for these prizes is open to all students of the University.

COWAN GOLD MEDALS.-In 1836, Dr. Cowan, of Sunderland, presented to the University the sum of £400, the interest to be applied annually in the purchase of Two Gold Medals of the value of £10, 10s. each, to be awarded to the two students who may distinguish themselves most in the Greek and Latin Examination upon the Blackstone; and shortly afterwards (1839) the same gentleman presented the University with an additional sum of £105, the interest to be expended annually in the purchase of a Gold Medal of the value of £5, to be awarded to the best student in the Humanity Class.

The examination for Dr. Cowan's Medals will be held early in November, 1883. Competitors to be eligible must be public students in some curriculum class in the Faculty of Arts.

For the Greek Medal-1. A candidate must have received a Certificate in the Greek Class for Session 1882-83.

2. Every candidate will be required to answer a Preliminary Paper, consisting of unprepared passages for translation.

3. Two or more candidates, selected by this paper, will on a subsequent day be examined orally in the books which they offer.

4. Each selected candidate must offer for the Oral Examination (i.) one Verse Subject, (ii.) one Prose Subject. (i.) The Verse Subject may be either five books of Homer, or two Greek plays (tragedies or comedies). (ii.) The Prose Subject may be any one of the following:-(a) Herodotus-two books; (b) Thucydides-two books; (c) Plato-two dialogues, or two books of the Republic; (d) Aristotle-two books of the Ethics, of the Politics, or of the Rhetoric.

5. Any member of the Greek Class for Session 1883-84 is at liberty to go in for the Preliminary Paper, even though he is not a candidate for the Cowan Medal; and, if he acquits himself with distinction in that Paper, his name will be mentioned when the award of the Medal is announced.

For the Latin Medal, competitors must either have received in session 1882-83 a public ticket of the Latin Class, or must, in November, 1883, have passed as entrants the preliminary examination in Latin.

Notice is hereby given that at the examination for Dr. Cowan's Medals in November, 1883, and thereafter, no one will be admitted to compete for the Greek Cowan Medal who has attended for more than three sessions, or who, after passing the preliminary examination in Greek, has attended for more than two sessions in any Scottish University, and no one shall be admitted to compete for the Latin Cowan Medal who has attended for more than two sessions, or who, after passing the preliminary examination in Latin, has attended for more than one session in any Scottish University.

DOBBIE - SMITH GOLD MEDAL. In 1881 Mr. Thomas Smith, L.R.C.S.E., Heriot Hill House, Edinburgh, presented to the University in memory of his wife, lately deceased, the sum of £150 for the purpose of founding a University Gold Medal of about £10 in value, to be given biennially for the encouragement of the study of Botany. The competition is open to all Matriculated Students of the Session in which the Medal is to be awarded; the subject of competition-which shall always be a botanical subject to be selected by the Professors of Botany and Natural History, and announced at least eighteen months before the date fixed for receiving essays.

The subject for the second competition to be an Essay "On any branch of Plant Pathology. The essay to be accompanied by an illustrative series of macroscopic and microscopic specimens. Essays to be given in to the Principal on or before 14th November, 1884.

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DOWANHILL PRIZES.-Two prizes, one of £21, and the other of £10 10s., for "Excellence in the Art of Oratory and Declamation, and in the practice of a refined and pleasing Delivery, and in reading the Scriptures," founded in 1865, by Mr. John Buchanan, merchant in Glasgow, as sole Trustee, nominated and appointed by his deceased brother, Mr. Thomas Buchanan, also merchant in Glasgow, and in order to carry out the intentions of his said brother. These prizes are awarded annually to students of Divinity, at the termination of the third or fourth session of their attendance on the Hall, by the votes of their fellow-students. Competitors must have attended for two sessions an Elocution Class, taught by a master approved by the Senate.*

The above foundation is in memory of the late Mr. James Buchanan, of Dowanhill, of Ellison MacCallum, his wife, and of Mr. George Buchanan, of Stanley, Perthshire, the Father, Mother, and elder Brother of the Founder.

EWING GOLD MEDAL.-In 1828, James Ewing, LL.D., of Levenside, presented the University with £100 for a Gold Medal to be given every second year for the best Essay on an historical subject. The Gartmore and Ewing Medals are to be given alternately.

GARTMORE GOLD MEDAL.-In 1788, Mr. Robert Grahame, of Gart

* The following masters are approved by the Senate Mr. Walter Baynham, Mr. Henry Cooke, Mr. Thomas Harrower, Mr. William S. Vallance, Mr. A. P. Roxburgh Mr. Whaley B. Nutt.

more, presented the University with £100 for the institution of a Prize for the best Essay on any subject intimately connected with the nature, foundation, advantages, and support of Political liberty. This prize—a Gold Medal—is open to the competition of all students of the University, and is given biennially. The surpluses to be accumulated till a capital is formed sufficient to found a Bursary.

GLADSTONE HISTORICAL PRIZE.-Founded in 1880 by the Gladstone Club, in commemoration of the election in 1877 of the Right Honourable William Ewart Gladstone, M.P., as Lord Rector of Glasgow University, and in recognition of his distinguished career as a scholar, author, statesman, and orator. The following are the regulations :—

1. The Prize shall be given for the best examination in English History.

2. The Examination shall be held biennially.

3. The value of the Prize shall be Twenty Guineas.

4. The competition shall be open to Graduates of Glasgow University of not more than two years' standing from the date of their first graduation. The second competition will take place in January, 1884. Names of competitors to be given in to the Assistant-Clerk of Senate not later than 1st December, 1883.

GEORGE HARVEY PRIZE. -Founded in 1874, by the liberality of a donor who withholds his name, in memory of the late Mr. George Harvey, of No. 9 Park Quadrant, Glasgow. Annual value, ordinarily £20, which is given as a prize in the class of Civil Engineering, to the student who shows, during the session, the greatest proficiency in the department of Applied Mechanics and Shipbuilding. Any accumulation of surplus income to be given as a second prize of £5 or £10, in the same department.

HENDERSON PRIZE. -In 1850, Mr. John Henderson, of Park, merchant in Glasgow, instituted an annual Prize of the value of £21 sterling, to be called the "Henderson Prize," for the best Essay on some subject relating to the Divine Authority and Practical Value and Influence of the Sabbath.

JAMIESON PRIZE. In 1854 a subscription list was opened for the foundation of a prize or scholarship in Divinity, but the commercial difficulties of the following years prevented the purpose of the promoters being carried out at the time. In 1881 the sum subscribed, amounting, with accumulated interest, to £319, 6s. 4d., was handed over to the University, and the Senate resolved to connect it with the name of the Convener of the Committee of subscribers, the Rev. Dr. Jamieson, formerly minister of St. Paul's Church, Glasgow.

The following regulations were adopted by the Senate, March 9th, 1882:

1. The Jamieson Prize shall be awarded annually by competition. 2. At the first competition (April, 1883), and thereafter biennially, the examination shall be in Divinity and Church History; at the second competition (Nov., 1883), and thereafter biennially, the examination shall be in Hebrew and Biblical Criticism.

3. The subjects of examination in each of the four departments shall be the same as those prescribed for the Degree of B.D.

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