The Vision : Or Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise of Dante Alighieri, Volume 1

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J. Taylor, 1831
 

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Page 175 - These weeds of miserable flesh we wear; And do thou strip them off from us again.' Then, not to make them sadder, I kept down My spirit in stillness. That day and the next We all were silent. Ah, obdurate earth ! Why open'dst not upon us ? When we came To the fourth day, then Gaddo at my feet...
Page 15 - Fame of them the world hath none, Nor suffers; mercy and justice scorn them both; Speak not of them, but look, and pass them by.
Page 212 - For, behold, in those days, and in that time, when I shall bring again the captivity of Judah and Jerusalem, I will also gather all nations, and will bring them down into the valley of Jehoshaphat, and will plead with them there for My people and for My heritage Israel, whom they have scattered among the nations, and parted My land.
Page 3 - IN the midway * of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy wood, astray Gone from the path direct ; and e'en to tell, It were no easy task, how savage wild That forest, how robust and rough its growth, Which to remember only, my dismay Renews, in bitterness not far from death.
Page 27 - Love, that in gentle heart is quickly learnt, Entangled him by that fair form, from me Ta'en in such cruel sort, as grieves me still : Love that denial takes from none beloved, Caught me with pleasing him so passing well, That, as thou seest, he yet deserts me not. Love brought us to one death : Caina waits The soul, who spilt our life.
Page 218 - And the LORD God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it. And the LORD God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die.
Page 159 - attentively regard Adamo's woe. When living, full supply Ne'er lack'd me of what most I coveted; One drop of water now, alas! I crave. The rills, that glitter down the grassy slopes Of Casentino, making fresh and soft The banks whereby they glide to Arno's stream, Stand ever in my view...
Page 260 - There is, said Michael, if thou well observe The rule of not too much, by temperance taught In what thou eat'st and drink'st, seeking from thence Due nourishment, not gluttonous delight, Till many years over thy head return : So mayst thou live, till like ripe fruit thou drop Into thy mother's lap, or be with ease Gather'd, not harshly pluck'd, for death mature. This is old age...
Page 67 - We enter'd on a forest, where no track Of steps had worn a way. Not verdant there The foliage, but of dusky hue; not light The boughs and tapering, but with knares deform'd And matted thick: fruits there were none, but thorns Instead, with venom fill'd.
Page 30 - As florets, by the frosty air of night Bent down and closed, when day has blanch'd their leaves, Rise all unfolded on their spiry stems; So was my fainting vigour new...

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