Hippopathology: a treatise on the disorders and lameness of the horse; with their methods of cure, Volume 1

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Page 28 - The centre moved, a circle straight succeeds, Another still, and still another spreads; Friend, parent, neighbour, first it will embrace; His country next; and next all human race...
Page 52 - And the priest shall look upon him the seventh day : and if it be spread much abroad in the skin, then the priest shall pronounce him unclean : it is the plague of leprosy.
Page 249 - After the shoe has been removed, thin the sole until it will yield to the pressure of the thumb ; then cut the under parts of the wall in an oblique direction from the heel to the anterior part, immediately under the seat of complaint, and only as far as it extends, and rasp the side of the wall thin enough to give way to the pressure of ihe over-distended parts, and put on a bar shoe rather elevated from the frog.
Page 321 - ... where the water is not confined to the belly and limbs, but shews itself in several parts of the body, with soft swellings which yield to the pressure of the fingers, as is usual in all dropsical habits.
Page 125 - Indeed, without the use of alterative medicines l — exclusively of physic — no hunter can be got into blooming condition ; that is to say, to look well in his skin, to dry immediately after a sweat, and to be in full vigour of body. Of these medicines there are several sorts in use ; but the diuretic and diaphoretic are in my opinion the best. It is almost needless to observe that the latter act upon the skin : but as sensible perspiration in the horse is not to be obtained by medicine without...
Page 12 - a grand pathological inference," the following : " The interruption or obstruction of any important secreting or eliminating function, if not compensated by the increased or modified action of some other organs, vitiates the Hood more or less; and if such vitiation be not soon removed, by the restoration of the function primarily affected, or by the increased exercise of an analogous function, more important changes are produced in the blood, if the energies of life are insufficient to expel the...
Page 249 - ... the anterior part, immediately under the seat of complaint, and only as far as it extends, and rasp the side of the wall thin enough to give way to the pressure of the over-distended parts; and put on a bar-shoe, rather elevated from the frog. Ascertain with a probe the direction of the sinuses, and introduce into them a saturated solution of sulphate of zinc, with a small syringe.
Page 125 - ... succession, with half an ounce of antimony, finely levigated, in each ball. These medicines combined will check that excitement of the general habit which always accompanies a transition from rest to work, purify the blood, and give tone and vigour to the system. Nitre has been much used by grooms as a cooling diuretic, and a preventive of disease from such causes; but it must be borne in mind that nitre is a strong repellant, and of a debilitating nature.
Page 199 - Next in universal application is the understanding that the saddle should haye everywhere an equal bearing, neither tilting forward upon the points nor backward upon the seat. When the saddle is on, and the girths fastened, there should remain space sufficient between the withers and the pommel for the introduction of the hand underneath the latter. The points of the tree should clip or embrace the sides without pinching them, or so standing outward that the pressure is all downwards, and upon one...
Page 199 - ... everywhere an equal bearing, neither tilting forward upon the points nor backward upon the seat. When the saddle is on, and the girths fastened, there should remain space sufficient between the withers and the pommel for the introduction of the hand underneath the latter. The points of the tree should clip or embrace the sides without pinching them, or so standing outward that the pressure is all downwards, and upon one place, instead of being in a direction inwards as well as downwards, so as...

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