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" Father of all blessings — it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse, and heavier pains and penalties fall upon those who would elude... "
The Works of ... Edmund Burke - Page 368
by Edmund Burke - 1803
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A Third Letter to a Member of the Parliament, on the Proposals for Peace ...

1797 - 165 pages
...inflicted as a curfe, it is as might be expected from the curfes ot the Father of all Bleffings — it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts....and penalties fall upon thofe who would elude the tafks which are put upon them by the great Mafter Workman of the World, who in his dealings with his...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Volume 8

Edmund Burke - France - 1803
...the curfes of the,Father of all Blefllngs — it is tempered with many alleviations, many com* forts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refufe the very...and penalties fall upon thofe who would elude the tafks which are put upon them by the great Mafter Workman of the World, who in his dealings with his...
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Maxims and opinions, moral, political and economical, with ..., Volume 2

Edmund Burke - 1804
...inflicted as a curse, it is, as might be expected from the curses of the Father of all Blessings — it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much mone truly a curse, and heavier pains and penalties...
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The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Volume 4

Edmund Burke - Political science - 1807
...inflicted as a curse, it is as might be expected from the curses of the Father of all blessings — it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse, and heavier pains and penalties...
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The Resources of the British Empire: Together with a View of the Probable ...

John Bristed - Debts, Public - 1811 - 527 pages
...inflicted as a curse, it is as might be expected from the curses of the Father of all blessings;— it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse; and heavier pains and penalties...
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The Resources of the British Empire: Together with a View of the Probable ...

John Bristed - Debts, Public - 1811 - 527 pages
...inflicted as a curse, it is as might be expected from the curses of the Father of all blessings;— it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it and to refuse the rery terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse; and heavier pains and penalties...
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Maxims, Opinions and Characters, Moral, Political, and Economical, Volume 2

Edmond Burke - English literature - 1815
...inflicted as a curse, it is, as might be expected from the curses of the Father of all Blessings — it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse, and heavier pains and penalties...
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Blackwood's Magazine, Volume 36

England - 1834
...this toil was inflicted as a curse, it is, as might be expected from the Father of all blessings, — it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse,and heavier pains and penalties...
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The Port Folio

Philadelphia (Pa.) - 1824
...was inflicted as a curse, it is (as might be expected from the curses of the Father of all blessings) tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse; and heavier pains and penalties...
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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 36

Scotland - 1834
...this toil was inflicted as a curse, it is, as might be expected from the Father of all blessings, — it is tempered with many alleviations, many comforts. Every attempt to fly from it, and to refuse the very terms of our existence, becomes much more truly a curse, and heavier pains and penalties...
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