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BOOK I.

3. Of the Principle of Demő-

cracy

ibid.

Of Laws in General. 4. Of the Principle of Aristo-

cracy

21

Chap.

5. That Virtue is not the Prin-

1. Of the Relation of Laws to ciple of a Monarchical Go-

different Beings,

vernment

22

2. Of the Laws of Nature, 3 6. In what máöner Virtue is

3. Of Positive Laws

5 supplied in a Monarchical

Government

23

BOOK II.

7. Of the Principle of Monarchy

ibid.

Of Laws directly derived from the 8. That Honour is not the Prin-

nature of Government.

ciple of Despotic Govern-

24

1. Of the Nature of the three

9. Of the Principle of Despotic

different Governments · 7

Government

25

2. Of the Republican Govern- 10. Difference of Obedience in

ment, and the Laws relative

Moderate and Despotic Go-

to Democracy

... ibid.

vernments

.. 26

3. Of the Laws relative to the 11. Reflections on the preceding

Nature of Aristocracy

12

Chapters

27

4. Of the relation of Laws to the

nature of Monarchical Go-

BOOK IV.

vernment

14

8. Of the Laws relative to the That the Laws of Education ought

nature of a Despotic Govern- to be Relative to the Principles of

ment

16 Government.

1. Of the Laws of Education 28

BOOK III,

2. Of Education in Monarchies

ibid.

Of the Principles of the three kinds

3. Of Education in a Despotic

of Government.

Government

31

1. Difference between the nature 4. Difference between the effects

and Principle of Government of Ancient and Modern

17 Education

2. Of the Principle of different 5. Of Education, in a Repub-

Governments

18 lican Government

ibid.

C 2

32

6. Of some Institutions among | 18. Of Rewards conferred by the

the Greeks

33 Sovereign

64

7. In what case these singular 19. New consequences of the

Institutions may be of service Principles of the three Go-

35

vernments

65

8. Explication of a Paradox of

the Ancients, in respect to

BOOK VI.

Manners

36

Consequences of the Principles of

BOOK V.

different Governments with res-

pect to the Simplicity of Civil and

That the Laws given by the Legis- Criminal Laws, the form of

lator ought to be Relative to the Judgments, and the inflicting of

Principle of Government.

Punishments.

1. Idea of this Book

39 1. Of the Simplicity lof Civil

2. What is meant by Virtue in a Laws, in different Govern-

Political state

ibid.

69

3. What is meant by a love of 2. Of the Simplicity of Criminal

the Republic in a Democracy Laws in different Govern-

40

ments

4. In what manner the Love of 3. In what Governments, and in

Equality and Frugality is what cases the Judges ought

inspired

41 to determine according to

5. In what manner the Laws

the express Letter of the

Law

establish Equality in a De.

72

mocracy

ibid. 4. Of the manner of passing

6. In what manner the Laws Judgment

73

ought to maintain Frugality 5. In what Governments the

in a Democracy

44 Sovereign may be Judge 74

7. Other methods of favouring 6. That in Monarchies the Mi-

the Principle of Democracy nisters ought not to sit as

45

Judges

77

8. In what manner the Laws 7. Of a single Magistrate 78

ought to be relative to the 8. Of Accusation in different

Principle of Government in Governments

ibid.

an Aristocracy

48 9. Of the severity of Punish-

9. In what manner the Laws are ments in different Govern-

relative to their Principle in ments

79

Monarchies

52 10. Of the ancient French Laws

10. Of the Expedition peculiar to

80

the Executive Power in 11. That when a People are vir-

Monarchies

53 tuous, few punishments are

11. Of the Excellence of a Mo- necessary

.... 81
narchical Government 54 12. Of the Power of punishments

12. The same Subject continued

ibid.

55 13. Insufficiency of the Laws of

13. An Idea of Despotic Power Japan

83

ibid. 14. Of the spirit of the Roman

14. In what manner the laws are Senate

85

relative to the Principles of 15. Of the Roman Lawsin respect

Despotic Government .. 56 to Punishments ibid.

15. The same Subject continued 16. Of the just proportion betwixt

60 Punishments and Crimes 87

16. Of the Communication of 17. Of the Rack

Power

62 18. Of pecuniary and corporal Pu-

17. Of Presents

.... 63

nishments

ibid.

89

....

19. Of the Law of Retaliation 90 2. Of the Corruption of the Prin20. Of the Punishment of Fathers

ciples of Democracy ... ibid. for the Crimes of their Chil- 3. Of the Spirit of extreme dren ... ibid. Equality

110 21. Of the Clemency of the Prince 4. Particular Cause of the Cor

91 ruption of the People - 111

5. Of the Corruption of the BOOK VII.

Principle of Aristocracy ibid. Consequences of the different Prin

6. Of the Corruption of the ciples of the three Governments Principle of Monarchy 112 with respect to Sumptuary Laws,

7. The same Subject continued Luxury, and the condition of

113 Women,

8. Danger of the Corruption of 1. Of Luxury

the Principle of Monarchical 92 Government

114 2. Of Sumptuary Laws in a De

9. How ready the Nobility are mocracy

94

to defend the Throne ib. 3. Of Sumptuary Laws in an

10. Of the Corruption of the Aristocracy

95

Principle of Despotic Go4. Of Sumptuary Laws in a Mo

vernment

ibid. narchy

96

11. Natural Effects of the Good5. In what cases Sumptuary Laws are useful in a Monar

ness and Corruption of the chy

Principles of Government

97 6. Or the Luxury of China ... 98 12. The same Subject continued

116 7. Fatal Consequences of Luxury

117 in China

.... 99

13. The effect of an Oath among 8. Of Public Continency 100

virtuous People 9. Of the Condition or state of

...... 118 Women in different Govern- | 14. How the smallest change of

the Constitution is attended ments

ibid,

with the ruin of its Principles 10. Of the Domestic Tribunal

119 among the Romans

101

15. Sure Methods of preserving 11. In what manger the Institutions changed at Rome, toge 16. Distinctive Properties of a

the three Principles 120 ther with the Government

Republic

ibid. 102 12. Of the Guardianship of Wo- | 17. Distinctive Properties of a

Monarchy

121 men among the Romans 103 13. Of the Punishments decreed 18. Particular Case of the Spanish

Monarchy

122 by the Emperors, against the 19. Distinctive Properties of a

Incontinency of Women 104 14. Sumptuary Laws among the

Despotic Government ... ibid.

20. Consequence of the preceding Romans

105 15. Of Dowries and Nuptial ad-21. Of the Empire of China ibid.

Chapters

123 vantages in different constitutions

106 16. An excellent Custom of the

BOOK IX.
Samnites

107 17. Of Female Administration Of Laws in the Relation they beur

ibid.

lo a Defensive Force.

1. In what manner Republics BOOK VIII.

provide for their Safety 126 Of the Corruption of the Principles 2. That a confederate Governof the three Governments.

ment ought to be composed 1. General Idea of this Book 108 of States of the same Nature, 2. Of the Liberty of the Subject Of the Laws which Establish Politi

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especially of the Republican cal Liberty, with regard to the kind

127 Constitution. 3. Other requisites in a Con

1. A General Idea

149 federate Republic 128

2. Different Significations of the 4. In what manner Despotic Go- word Liberty

ibid. vernments provide for their

3. In what Liberty consists 150 security

129

4. The same Subject continued 5. In what manner a Monarchical

ibid. Government provides for 5. Of the End or View of differits security

ibid.

ent Governments 151 6. Of the defensive Force of

6. Of the Constitution of EngStates in general 130

land

152 7. A Reflexion

131

7. Of the Monarchies we are ac8. A particular case in which the

161 Defensive Force of a State is

quainted with

8. Why the Ancients had not a inferior to the Offensive 132

clear Idea of Monarchy 162 9. Of the relative Force of States

9. Aristotle's manner of Thinking ibid.

163 10. Of the weakness of neighbour- 10. What other Politicians thought ing States 133

ibid. 11. Of the King's of the heroic BOOK X.

Times of Greece

164 Of Laws in the Relation they bear 12. Of the Government of the to Offensive Force.

Kings of Rome, and in what

mammer the three powers were 1. Of Offensive Force

.... 133
there distributed

165 2. Of War

ibid.
13. General Reflexions on

the 3. Of the Right of Conquest 134 State of Rome after the Ex4. Some Advantages of a con

pulsion of its kings 167 quered People ...... 136 14. In what manner the distribu5. Gelon, king of Syracuse 138

tion of the three Powers 6. Of Conquests made by a Re

began to change after the public

ibid.

Expulsion of the Kings 168 7. The same Subject continued 15. In what manner Rome, in the

139

flourishing State of that Re8. The same Subject continued

public, suddenly lost its Li. 140 berty

170 9. Of Conquests made by a Mo 16. Of the Legislative Power in narchy

ibid.
the Roman Republic

171 10. Of one Monarchy that sub- 17. Of the Executive Power in dues another

141

the same Republic 172 11. Of the manners of a conquer- 18. Of the Judiciary Power in the ed People

ibid.

Roman Government • 174 12. Of a Law of Cyrus 142 19. Of the Government of the 13. CHARLES XII.

ibid.

Roman Provinces 179 14. ALEXANDER 144 20. The End of this Book

181 15. New Methods of preserving a Conquest

147

BOOK XII. 16. Of Conquests made by a

Despotic Prince 148 Of the Laws that form Political 17. The same Subject continued Liberty, as Relative to the Sub

ibid. ject.
BOOK XI,
1. Idea of this Book

182

ibid.

....OC

3. The same Subject continued | 29. Of the Civil Laws proper for

183 mixing some portion of Li4. That Liberty is favoured by

berty in a Despotic Governthe Nature and Proportion ment

...... 206 of Punishments .... 184 30. The same Subject continued 5. Of certain Accusations that

207 require particular Moderation and Prudence

186

BOOK XIII. 6. Of the Crime against Nature

Of the Relation which the Levying

188 7. Of the Crime of High Treason

of Tares and the greatness of the 189

Public Revenues have to Liberty. 8. Of the bad Application of the 1. Of the Public Revenues 208

Name of Sacrilege and High 2. That it is bad Reasoning to
Treason ...

ibid. say that the greatness of 9. The same Subject continued taxes is good in its own

191
Nature ....

209 10. The same Subject continued 3. Of Taxes in Countries where

192 part of the people are Vil11. Of Thoughts

ibid. leins or Bondmen 210 12. Of indiscreet Speeches ibid. 4. Of a Republic in the like Case 13. Of Writings • 194

ibid. 14. Breach of Modesty in Punish- 5. Of a Monarchy in the like ing Crimes ... 195 Case

.... ibid. 15. Of the Infranchisement of 6. Of a Despotic Government in

Slaves in order to accuse the like Case ...... 211 their Master

196 7. Of Taxes in Countries where 16. Of Calumny with regard to Villeinage is not established the Crime of High Treason ib.

ibid. 17. Of the revealing of Conspira- 8. In what manner the Deception cies

197

is preserved ...... 213 18. How dangerous it is in Re- 9. Of a bad kind of impost_214

publics to be too severe in 10. That the greatness of Taxes punishing the Crime of High depends on the Nature of the Treason

Government 19. In what manner the Use of 11. Of Confiscations

215 Liberty is suspended in a 12. Relation between the weight

Republic .... 199 of Taxes and Liberty .. 216 20. Of Laws favourable to the 13. In what Government Taxes

Liberty of the Subject in a are capable of Increase 217

Republic .... 200 14. That the Nature of the Taxes 21. Of the Cruelty of Laws in is relative to the Government respect to debtors in a Re

ibid. public ibid. 15. Abuse of Liberty

.... 218 22. Of things that strike at Li- 16. Of the Conquests of the Maberty in Monarchies .. 202 hometans

219 23. Of Spies in Monarchies ibid. 17. Of the augmentation of Troops 24. Of Anonymous Letters 203

ibid. 25. Of the manner of Governing 18. Ofan exemption from taxes 220 in Monarchies

204 19. Which is most suitable to the 26. That in a Monarchy the Prince Prince and to the People,

ought to be of easy Access ib. the farming the Revenues, or 27. Of the Manners of a Monarch managing them by Commis205 sion?

.221 28. Of the regard which monarchs 20. Of the Farmers of the Reveowe to their Subjects ibid.

222

ibid.

ibid

nues

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