The citizen of the world; or, Letters from a Chinese philosopher, residing in London, to his friends in the East, Volume 1

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G.A. Grieshammer, 1810
 

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Page 35 - Our greatest glory is, not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.
Page 279 - Did I say so? replied he coolly; to be sure if I said so, it was so-— dined in town: egad, now I do remember, I did dine in town: but I dined in the country too; for you must know, my boys, I eat two dinners. By the bye, I am grown as nice as the devil in my eating.
Page 283 - By this time we were arrived as high as the stairs would permit us to ascend, till we came to what he was facetiously pleased to call the first floor down the chimney ; and knocking at the door, a voice from within demanded, who's there ? My conductor answered that it was him.
Page 124 - THOUGH fond of many acquaintances, I desire an intimacy only with a few. The man in black whom I have often mentioned, is one whose friendship I could wish to acquire, because he possesses my esteem. His manners, it is true, are tinctured with some strange inconsistencies; and he may be justly termed a humorist in a nation of humorists.
Page 283 - ... last, however, we got to the door of a dismal-looking house in the outlets of the town, where he informed me he chose to reside for the benefit of the air. We entered the lower door, which...
Page 35 - We should feel sorrow, says he, but not sink under its oppression ; the heart of a wise man should resemble a mirror, which reflects every object without being sullied by any.
Page 286 - By this time my curiosity began to abate, and my appetite to increase : the company of fools may at first make us smile, but at last never fails of rendering us melancholy ; I therefore pretended to recollect a prior engagement, and, after having...
Page 130 - The same ambition that actuates a monarch at the head of an army, influenced my father at the head of his table. He told the story of the ivy-tree, and that was laughed at; he repeated the jest of the two scholars and one pair of breeches, and the company laughed at that; but the story of Taffy in the sedan-chair, was sure to set the table in a roar. Thus his pleasure increased in proportion to the pleasure he gave; he loved all the world, and he fancied all the world loved him.
Page 284 - Fire and fury, no more of thy stupid explanations, cried he. — Go and inform her we have got company. Were that Scotch hag to be for ever in my family, she would never learn politeness, nor forget that absurd poisonous accent of hers, or testify the smallest specimen of breeding or high life; and yet it is very surprising too, as I had her from a parliament man, a friend of mine, from the highlands, one of the politest men in the world; but that's a secret.
Page 132 - After I had resided at college seven years, my father died, and left me— his blessing. Thus shoved from shore without ill-nature to protect, or cunning to guide, or proper stores to subsist me in so dangerous a voyage, I was obliged to embark in the wide world at twenty-two. But, in order to settle in life, my friends advised (for they always advise when they begin to despise us), they advised me, I say, to go into orders. "To be obliged to wear a long wig, when I liked a short one, or a black...

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